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NEWS ECHA delays lead pigments report


The European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) has announced a delay of around six months in the submission of its REACH Annex XV restriction report on lead chromate, lead sulpho-chromate yellow (CI pigment Yellow 34), and lead chromate molybdate sulphate red (CI pigment Red 104) due to uncertainty over recycling rules. A spokesperson for the agency said it was not able to move ahead with the submission until it knew the European Commission’s next move for its restriction proposals on the use of lead compounds for stabilisation


At the time of publication,


Recycling policy and court decisions delay ECHA Annex XV report on lead pigments


of PVC, which were voted down by the European Parliament (Compounding World January 2020 page 12 https://bit.ly/2Wp2dYX ) “Both [proposals] deal


with lead in plastics and both identify release during end-of-life as the main source of emissions, hence, the assessments are very similar,” the spokesperson said.


Hillenbrand sells Cimcool


US industrial group Hillenbrand is to sell its Cimcool business to speciality chemicals firm DuBois Chemicals for $224m, plus a further $26m contingent on a future sale. It acquired the company, which makes and sells metal


Hillenbrand CEO Joe Raver


cutting fluids, in 2019 through its acquisition of Milacron and said at the time it was reviewing strategic options. According to Hillenbrand CEO and President Joe Raver, it will use the proceeds “for de-leveraging activities, strength- ening our financial position as we seek to enhance our leadership positions in the industrial platforms that represent our most compelling opportunities for profitable growth.” Hillenbrand owns a number of industrial companies, including compounding equipment group Coperion. � www.hillenbrand.com


Profits up at R&P Polyplastic


Russian compounder R&P Polyplastic reported sales of RUB10bn (€117m) for 2019, with net profit up by 8% to RUB726m (€8.5m). Total sales amounted to 89,000 tonnes.


“In 2020 we are planning not only to substantially raise our production volumes but also to improve our financial results,” said Managing Partner Andrey Menshov.


10 COMPOUNDING WORLD | May 2020


R&P Polyplastic’s largest end-user market by volume is automotive (31%). Other key markets include household appliances (26%) and construction materials (18%). During 2019 the company said it began serial production of material for the bump- ers of the latest Renault Arkana and success- ful passed testing for Hyundai. � http://polyplastic-compounds.ru


the European Commission had not responded to a request for more information on its plans to regulate lead stabilisers in recycled PVC. ECHA also said it was waiting for the outcome of a pending court case over a 2016 authorisation for the use of the same lead pigments. This was chal- lenged by Sweden then subsequently appealed by the EC. “Depending on the outcome of the policy discussions and the court case appeal, we may need to revise our report before submission,” ECHA said. � echa.europa.eu


Ineos tips chemical recycling


Ineos and Plastic Energy are to collaborate in the construction of a new plant to convert previously unrecyclable waste plastic into raw material for conversion into new plastic. No location has been disclosed but the companies said they are targeting production by the end of 2023. This move follows trials


of Plastic Energy’s recycling process and subsequent conversion into polymer at the Ineos cracker in Cologne, Germany. That is said to have resulted in polymer with an identical specification to virgin material. � www.ineos.com


www.compoundingworld.com


IMAGE: HILLENBRAND


IMAGE: SHUTTERSTOCK


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