search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
NATURAL FIBRES | REINFORCEMENTS


Natural fibres stretch beyond sustainability


The latest developments in natural fibre processing move beyond simply lifting the bio-content of compounds to truly elevating their performance.Peter Mapleston finds out more


There’s a growing interest in natural fibre rein- forced polymer compounds and Nordic organisa- tions, perhaps unsurprisingly given the availability of the key natural resources to them and the region’s reputation for sustainably-focused tech- nologies, are playing a dominant role. Commercial companies and research operations in Finland and Norway in particular are making significant pro- gress in the use of cellulosic fibres to enhance the sustainability and performance of plastic com- pounds. Interesting work is also taking place in forest-rich North America. “Environmental concerns over plastics littering


are motivating the development of sustainable biocomposites, where biobased plastics reinforced with lignocellulosic fibres are clear options,” says Gary Chinga Carasco, Lead Scientist at RISE PFI, the Norwegian lignocellulosic biomass research institute. “The wood processing industry has realised the potential of lignocellulosic fibres as replacement and reinforcement of plastics and bioplastics. We see a constant development of new biocomposite products.” Carasco says the benefits of lignocellulosic fibres include the improvement of the mechanical,


www.compoundingworld.com


as well as the environmental, performance of compounds. He says RISE PFI has been a major driver in realising these benefits. He cites the FiberComp project on high-performance wood fibre composite materials and the ValBio-3D project on valorisation of residual biomass for advanced 3D printed materials, which he coordi- nated, as examples, saying they are contributing to the realisation of novel compounds containing lignocellulosic fibres and various types of biobased polymers such as PLA and PHA, as well as polyole- fins derived from sugar. He also highlights several projects where companies from the wood processing and injection moulding industries are collaborating in Norway. Examples include recent initiatives and investments at paper maker Norske Skog Saugbrugs and bio-refiner Borregaard, in which the two companies will use spruce fibre from their production to produce biocomposite pellets. Applications are envisaged within various industries, including furniture, automotive, construction and packaging. Recent research activities have also demonstrat-


ed that wood fibres can improve biodegradation in soil of bioplastics such as polyhydroxyalkanoates


May 2020 | COMPOUNDING WORLD 15


Main image: Bagasse waste from industrial sugar cane processing is one of many potential sources of performance- enhancing natural fibre additives


IMAGE: SHUTTERSTOCK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68