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TECHNOLOGY | 3D PRINT MATERIALS


Right: Diran 410MF07 is a Stratasys PA grade formulated for low friction applications


is collaborating with Victrex to develop polyary- lether ketone (PAEK) polymers and composites, is able to handle materials with melting tempera- tures up to around 300°C. Victrex has devel- oped a number of PAEK grades specifically for AM. Arkema is working with Zurich-based


start-up 9T Labs, which is focused on high-volume mass-production of carbon- fibre composite parts using Arkema’s Kep- stan polyether ether ketone (PEKK). 9T Labs is a spin-off from ETH Zurich set up in 2018 that has developed a software system called Fibrify that defines optimal fibre designs and allows control of fibre placement through a 3D-printed part. In February 2020, 9T Labs announced a partner- ship with US engineering simulation firm ANSYS to provide an integrated design and simulation workflow solution. An interface between ANSYS Composite PrepPost (ACP) and 9T Lab’s Fibrify design software allows the import of fibre lay-ups and converts them into a model for finite element analysis (FEA). Designs can then be optimised in the simulation software before they are produced, when the Fibrify Production software module controls and monitors processing. 9T Labs launched its Red Series solution in


March, which combines software, additive manu- facturing equipment, engineering services, and materials—including a neat polymer filament and a composite filament—for carbon-fibre composite part production using FFF. Currently, the company supplies continuous carbon fibre in PA12 and PEKK filaments, but it plans to add other matrix polymers in the longer term. It says its technology will help


reduce the cost constraints of carbon-fibre composites for metal replacement due to its higher degree of freedom in optimising part geometry and fibre layup and its processing automation.


Proprietary approach Equipment developer Stratasys has introduced several new proprietary high-temperature and chemical resistant thermoplastics for its FDM printers. Antero 840CN03 is a PEKK from Arkema for use with the Stratasys Fortus F900 3D printer that provides electrostatic discharge (ESD) perfor- mance for aerospace and industrial applications. Diran 410MF07 is a PA material formulated by Stratasys for the Stratasys F370 3D printer, offering the toughness, low friction, and low sliding resistance needed for tooling. An acrylonitrile butadiene styrene material with ESD properties — ABS-ESD7 — is also designed for tooling applica- tions. It had previously been available on Stratasys Fortus printers but can now also be used on the Stratasys F370 3D printer. The launch of the HP Digital Manufacturing Network in 2019 marked an expansion of HP’s strategic alliances, bringing in partners BASF,


GLOBAL POLYMER DEMAND DATA NEW REPORT: FIND OUT MORE


Key information to quickly and efficiently develop your business strategy • Get granular market data and intelligence to support business planning or investment projects


• Identify the size and structure of demand, discover where market opportunities lie and adjust strategies accordingly


• Understand plastics industry dynamics which are increasingly under the spotlight as circular economy concerns intensify


Robust research and expert data for the global plastics industry Detailed consumption of


14 Polymers 10 Processing techniques


7 Regions of the world


IMAGE: STRATASYS


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