search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
TECHNOLOGY | FOAMS


Table 1: Typical properties of SABIC Fortify C11075DF (physical properties measured from specimens cut from compression moulded plaques)


Property Density, kg/m³ (ASTM D1505)


Melt Flow Rate @ 230°C/2.16 kg, g/10 min (ASTM D1238) Melt Flow Rate @ 190°C/2.16 kg, g/10 min (ASTM D1238) Shore A hardness (1 second) (ASTM D1238) Flexural Modulus (1% Secant), MPa (ASTM D790A) Tear Strength (Type C), kN/m (ASTM D624) Peak Melting Temperature, °C (SABIC method) Glass Transition Temperature (Tg), °C (SABIC method) Source: SABIC


Typical value 868 2 1


71 13 39 62


-52


Table 2: Key properties of SABIC PP-UMS HEX17112 (*Speed of testing: 1 mm/min; **Speed of testing: 50 mm/min; ***Flat wise (test bar 80x10x4mm))


Property


Melt Flow Rate (230°C, 2.16 kg), g/10 min (ISO 1133) Density, kg/m3


(ASTM D1505)


Tensile modulus*, MPa (ISO 527-2 1A) Elongation at break**, % (ISO 527-2 1A) Izod notched impact strength at 23°C, kJ/m2 Melt Strength, cN (SABIC method)


Typical value 2.5


905


1925 15


(ISO 180/1A)


2.2 68


Heat deflection temperature at 0.45 MPa (HDT/B)***, °C (ISO 75) 110 Source: SABIC


Right: Injection moulded foamed instrument panel carrier produced in SABIC high melt strength PP


54


ing. At the time of the launch, Frank de Vries, SABIC’s global Foam & Lightweight Leader, said that the company’s intensified focus on foam technology covers the entire value chain. “We all face many global challenges due to an ever-grow- ing population and increasingly limited resources. Foaming is key to help solving these challenges, by pushing industries to invest in solutions that are both sustainable and cost-efficient, with enhanced material properties,” he said. Borealis is generally recognised as the front-run- ner in high-melt-strength polypropylenes (which get their strength and extensibility from long chain branching). At the recent AMI conference, Applica- tion Development Engineer Antti Tynys discussed the firm’s Daploy HMS PP, mainly in extruded foam applications. Depend- ing on the foam density, Daploy HMS PP is suitable for products spanning cups and bowls (80-600kg/m3


), automotive


components such as door and roof liners, air ducts and impact protection (40-350kg/ m3


), building insulation (60-200kg/m3 COMPOUNDING WORLD | January 2019 ), and numerous other areas from HVAC to sports and leisure. www.compoundingworld.com


Sustainable solutions Tynys also addressed the question of whether or not plastic foam can be considered a sustainable and environmentally friendly solution, in the light of several big packaging users turning away from such products (mostly polystyrene) in favour of paper and card-based alternatives. She discussed work Borealis has been doing on the recycling potential for non-crosslinked PP foamed cups – in a project in Taiwan it tracked the PP fraction in the cup waste stream which showed good results. Borealis is also starting up a pilot project in Europe on foamed PP cup recycling. Another PP major, LyondellBasell, is also working in this area. At the US edition of AMI’s Polymer Foam conference in Pittsburgh last June, Dr. Vassilios Galiatsatos, Applications Development – Catalloy, talked about developing innovative reac- tor grades of elastomer-modified PP (TPOs) for foams. The company has been studying the foamability of various existing Catalloy grades using physical and chemical blowing, partly in cooperation with Reedy Chemical Foam. Results to date show that the high molecular weight rubber in Catalloy TPOs provides melt strength for good foamability. The wide range of flexural moduli obtainable with different grades (ranging from 20 MPa for one type of Softell through to 800 MPa for a Hifax grade) makes it possible to produce soft and rigid foams “bridging the continuum between PE and PP,” Galiatsatos said. Density reductions up to 60% have so far been achieved, and a range of cell sizes, down to 25 micron. The company plans to carry out further physical property testing and also to work on physi- cally blown foams. Japan Polypropylene Corp also offers HMS-PP foamable grades. These are based on its metallo- cene technology and marketed under the Waymax EX banner. The company cites an “excellent balance of MFR and melt strength, and strong strain hardening.” The supplier says the grades enable high expansion ratios and uniform and fine cell structures to be obtained.





PHOTO: SABIC


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70