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MATERIALS | FILM ADDITIVES


Right: Dow Performance Silicones’ MB25-235 masterbatch is claimed to improve slip characteristics at low addition rates


metallization and potential contamination of food or other contents. The new product is also claimed to be cost-effective, since it only needs to be incorporated into the outer layer of multi-layer films. In addition it helps reduce haze.


Agricultural films The MB25-235 Masterbatch is also well suited for use in agricultural mulch film, greenhouse film and silage film. Céline Chevallier, Product Development Engineer for Multibase, another part of DowDu- pont Specialty Products, discussed this application at the Agricultural Film 2018 Conference, organ- ised last September in Madrid by Compounding World publisher AMI. She presented test data on the dynamic and static CoF and mechanical performance of three-layer blown film, the outer layer of which was treated with the new grade (together with a talc antiblock commonly used with slip additives).


Chevallier said that optimum results are ob-


tained at an addition rate of between 2 and 4% by weight in the skin layer. Comparisons with organic slip agents depend on whether film/film or film/ metal CoF is measured. Tensile properties (strain and elongation at break, tear strength) are unaf- fected by the additive. Also working on alternatives to conventional


organic additives is Ampacet, which has devel- oped a new antiblock masterbatch for use in production of BOPP films. Seablock 4S is said to provide the antiblocking and permanent slip properties of organic antiblock solutions while avoiding scuffing of the particles and preserving the low slip properties, whatever the converting steps and speed. When converting BOPP films at high speed, some extraction of organic antiblock particles from


the film is a common problem. This scuffing can lead to accumulation of dust on the film surface and unpredictable variations of slip properties during converting. Ampacet says Seablock 4S allows BOPP film producers to manufacture high-quality films with permanent and predictable slip performances for smooth and consistent film converting. “Thanks to superior particle anchorage, Seablock


4S reduces scuffing and leads to a low level of dust accumulation during high speed film converting,” the company says, adding that the additive shows a good heat stability with “unmatched” low die and extruder fouling. Optical properties of the films are also said to be very good.


Anti-stat development Ampacet has also been adding to its range of additives to reduce the build-up of static electricity in films. Permstat 232 is specifically designed to reduce problems in printing, converting and labelling operations for bi-oriented films. “The labelling industry has been searching for permanent antistatic features for decades to


The effect of addition of Dow Performance Silicones’ MB25-235 masterbatch on coefficient of friction (CoF) when used in the skin layer of a three-layer LLDPE/LDPE blown film. Film/film CoF (left chart) is higher than the reference but film/metal CoF (right chart) is lower


24 COMPOUNDING WORLD | January 2019


Source: DowDupont www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: DOWDUPONT


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