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ADDITIVES | FLAME RETARDANTS


Above: A polymer sample undergoing UL94 vertical testing at Clariant


polyphthalic polyamides, the synergistic blends Exolit OP 1312, Exolit OP 1314 and Exolit OP 1400 are the choice for PA6 and 66. “For bio-based and long-chain polyamides especially, Exolit OP 1400 shows good efficiency,” according to Clariant. “All Exolit OP products have good mechanical


properties and a CTI (Comparative Tracking Index) of 600 volt in common. This, together with good colourability, makes them ideal for demanding applications like connectors used for e-mobility. At the same time sustainability and recyclability of flame retarded polymeric products is of critical concern,” the company says. Clariant adds that in a recent study conducted by


the Fraunhofer Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability (Fraunhofer LBF), PA6 and PA66 compounds containing Exolit OP were subject to multiple extrusion cycles followed by measurement of flammability and mechanical properties. “Both compounds kept the UL 94 V-0 classifications and showed the typical mechanical properties caused by shortening of the glass fibres after multiple extru- sions, but no further effects,” the company says.


Polymeric developments At another PINFA member, FRX Polymers, Ina Jiang, VP of Sales and Marketing, says the com- pany’s Nofia polymeric platform technology suits a wide range of applications. For instance, in polyes-


ter fibres and filaments, Nofia FR delivers up to a 30% increase in tenacity. In lower tenacity applica- tions, customers report up to a 30% higher fibre spinning speeds. In PET applications (for both fibres and injection moulding), Nofia flame retardants can act as a chain extender, which Jiang points out is particu- larly valuable when combined with a recycled PET feedstock. Some automotive non-woven clients are said to have been able to increase the recycle PET content from 50% to more than 94%. “Nofia polyphosphonates repair the PET chain, which leads to improved mechanical performance while at the same time meeting the FMVSS302 and NF P 92 503-507 (M1) FR standard,” says Jiang. Jiang also points to the high resistance of Nofia FRs to the fairly aggressive chemicals used for cleaning (in hospitals, for example). She says that in PET-based formulations, they have been found effective in being able to withstand stress cracking associated with such disinfectants. In the wire and cable market, Nofia polyphos-


phates provide UL1581 – VW1 fire retardant solutions for TPU and TPE systems in combination with other FRs, while maintaining a high-quality surface and strong physical properties, Jiang adds. “Nofia FR also enables full transparency of FR BOPET-based cable wrap, meeting the cosmetic requirements of designers and consumers for high-speed data cables.”


Radical generators Fraunhofer LBF is pursuing multiple avenues in its research on flame retardants. At AMI’s Fire Resistance in Plastics conference, Rudolf Pfaendner, Division Director, Plastics, is due to discuss novel oxyimide radical generators, which have been shown to be efficient synergists for phosphonate flame retardants, as well as good FRs in their own right. Radical generators are efficient flame retardants and flame-retardant synergists, according to Pfaendner. He says novel oxyimides show high and adjustable degradation temperatures up to 380°C,


Observation of the burning process for PP and three FR systems by infrared camera showing the resulting temperature profile Source: Fraunhofer LBF


42 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2018 www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: CLARIANT


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