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MACHINERY | LAB COMPOUNDERS


Right: Leistritz demonstrated production of 3D print


filaments on a ZSE 18 Maxx lab extruder at this year’s NPE show


also important to these types of customers who do not want to deal with the maintenance of the equipment, however do want the equipment to be ready and available when needed for laboratory work.” KraussMaffei Berstorff says it is offering its ZE


28 BluePower laboratory extruder at a special price of €120,000 on 100 days delivery up until the start of next year to mark parent company KraussMaffei’s 180th


Below: KraussMaffei Berstorff is offering a


special anniver- sary version of its ZE 28 BluePower machine to the end of the year


anniversary. The special anniversary edition is based on the ZE BluePower extruder, which comprises comprehensive basic equipment with standard options and will be delivered as plug-and- play solution. According to the company, research divisions and compounding companies will benefit from the ZE 28 BluePower anniversary model, which offers screw drive power of up to 42kW at a maximum speed of 1,200 rpm to provide maximum productivity. Equipped with a BPCTouch control system, the twin-screw extruder is claimed to provide ease of operation with intuitive user guidance throughout the entire process. Lab compounding offerings from Leistritz include 18mm and 27mm diameter versions of its ZSE Maxx series (the company also offers a 12mm twin screw compounder but this is engineered for powder-fed pharmaceutical applications). Both plastics models can take on development work or short run produc- tion for masterbatch applications, for example. The ZSE 18 Maxx model offers 18mm diameter ratio of 1.66 and a rated torque


screws with a Do of 11 Nm/cm3


/Di . Designed for production rates of up


to 40kg/h, the unit can produce batch sizes of as little as 300g. The larger ZSE 27 MaXX is equipped with 28.3mm diameter screws. Do


/Di is the same


. It offers output rates of up to 350 kg/h. The company says scale up to production equipment is simplified by the consistent Do


1.66 as the smaller machine but torque rises to 12.5 Nm/cm3


/Di ratio and the use


of a modular design that allows production processes to be modelled in the laboratory. Lab compounders can also be used in low volume production applications. At last year’s NPE show in the US, Leistritz showed a ZSE 18 Maxx model configured with loss-in-weight feeders, gear pump, die, custom air-rack, belt puller, laser gauge and winder for development of 3D print filaments. The extruder was configured for operation at up to 425°C at throughputs of up to 20 kg/h. Leistritz said it saw the system as a development or low batch volume production system capable of “on-the-fly” recipe modification.


PHOTO: KRAUSSMAFFEI BERSTORFF 20 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2018


Changing needs According to Corné Verstraten, Chief Sales Officer at Dr Collin, specific issues driving new develop- ments in laboratory compounding at present include the need to incorporate fillers from renewable sources, the increasing use of biopoly- mers, and performance enhancement of polypro- pylene to allow it to compete with technical polymers. In addition, the company sees direct compounding being further developed. Examples include blown film or cast/sheet lines installed after the extruder, as well as installation of a compound- er in a film extrusion line. He says that to achieve these tasks in the laboratory, a compounder must offer flexibility, modularity and reproduc- ibility, with the configuration of the barrel and screw being able to be changed easily in a short time period. Other current areas of interest in laboratory compounding include the development of new compounds with the aim of finding the limits of filler in certain polymers, as well as reducing


www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: LEISTRITZ


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