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TRAINING ▶▶▶


Feed training teaches all about mycotoxins


BY MARIEKE PLOEGMAKERS, EDITOR ALL ABOUT FEED T


he Feeds and Nutrition course of Schothorst Feed Research is an annually recurring training pro- gramme in which participants are informed on the main theoretical and practical aspects of feed pro-


duction. This year, the feed course was organised in June and it consisted of 11 different modules. The first week’s modules provided in-depth information on feedstuffs and mycotoxins. In the following weeks there were courses on the various ani- mal species. Due to Covid-19 restrictions this was the first year the training was offered online. All About Feed had the opportunity to participate in one of the modules which fo- cused on mycotoxins. This training was led by Regiane Santos, researcher at Schothorst Feed Research.


Climate change and effect on mycotoxins During a two-day course, Regiane Santos covered everything about mycotoxins, starting with the basics. She informed the participants about which mycotoxins are especially impor- tant in livestock and in which feedstuffs which type of myco- toxins can be found. The training then went further in depth with information on how climate change is affecting the occurrence of mycotoxins. A combination of higher tempera-


For the tenth time, Schothorst Feed Research organised a Feeds and Nutrition course. For the first time the training was held online. All About Feed participated in the mycotoxin module of the course.


tures, CO2 and plant water activity leads to an increase in my-


cotoxin contamination of feed stuffs. Also, due to climate change, the incidence of insect pests will increase, Santos ex- plained that this could lead to more mycotoxin contamina- tion: “Insects make holes in the plants, which stimulates the growth of mould and thus mycotoxins. If we stop using pesti- cides, which is socially desirable, we can expect a lot more mycotoxins.” To adapt to the influences of climate change, Santos thinks we need to find a way to produce feed in a smart way. “We need technology for effective forecasting systems and real-time monitoring of mycotoxins.”


Regulation and sampling of feed Next up were the topics regulation and sampling. The only regulated mycotoxin in feed worldwide is Aflatoxin, while for the other feed-related toxins there are only recommended levels. These vary per continent or country. To ensure that the toxin level remains below these levels, samples are taken


The mycotoxin training zoomed in on the effects of the different mycotoxins on pigs and poultry.


▶ ALL ABOUT FEED | Volume 29, No. 5/6, 2021 37


PHOTO: MISSET


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