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PARTNER FEATURE ▶▶▶


Yeast hydrolysate improved growth and feed efficiency of Asian seabass


The low salinity conditions in which Asian seabass are typically grown enable them to grow fast but also presents a challenge. Two trials in young seabass showed that yeast hydrolysate supplementation improved the growth performance of these fish.


BY JUHANI VUORENMAA, R&D DIRECTOR HANKKIJA FFI S Weight g/fish ADG, g/fish


Daily FI, g/fish FCR, kg/kg


Mean villi length (µm) 34


Period 0 weeks 8 weeks 8 weeks 8 weeks 8 weeks


accharomyces yeast hydrolysate is produced by strong acid hydrolysis, which efficiently breaks down the yeast cell wall and transforms its mole- cules into a bioactive form. In particular, reduced


the molecular size and increased solubility of the molecules result in improved bioavailability both to gut microbes and to the immune cell receptors of intestinal mucosa. The feed supplement used in the study is a postbiotic, a beneficial product of microbial origin without any live microbes, which has its bioactive molecules available for interaction. Recent studies showed its benefits in Asian seabass.


Table 1 – Main results of trial 1. Parameter


Control 13.24a 52.35b 0.70b 0.96b 1.37a


467,55


1.10ab 1.19a


558.71


Progut® 0.15% Progut® 0.30% P- value 13.30a 66.27a 0.95a


13.21a 67.18a 0.96a 1.35a 1.40a


513.81 ▶ ALL ABOUT FEED | Volume 29, No. 5/6, 2021


0.876 0.043 0.039 0.046 0.126


Two dose response trials with juvenile and growing seabass Two trials were conducted to investigate the effects of dietary inclusion of yeast hydrolysate (Progut) on the performance of Asian sea bass (Lates calcarifer) in collaboration with Kaset- sart University at a university contract research farm, in Nakorn Pathom province, Thailand. The experiments were carried out in earth ponds under low salinity conditions which is a common, commercial production condition for seabass in Thailand. In trial 1 juvenile fish with a mean weight of 13 g were allo- cated to 12 net cages, 30 fish per cage, at a density of five fish/m³. The three dietary treatments tested were a commer- cial-type control feed and the same feed amended with ei- ther 0.15%, or 0.30% of the feed supplement. Four replicate cages were randomly allocated to each diet. The fish were fed three times per day at 3 – 5% of body weight for 8 weeks. The feed intake, weight gain, feed conversion ratio (FCR) and mortality of the fish were measured. At the end of the study, the blood of five fish per cage was sampled for analysis of several immunity-related variables. The length of the intesti- nal villi was also measured from the same fish. In trial 2, growing Asian seabass with a starting weight of ap- proximately 270 g (+23 g) were allocated to 20 net cages, 10 fish per cage, at a density of five fish/m³. There were four dietary treatments in the study, a commercial-type control feed and the same feed amended with either 0.10%, 0.15% or 0.20% Progut. Five replicate cages were randomly allocated to each treatment. The fish were fed three times per day at 3 – 5% of body weight for 12 weeks. The feed intake, weight gain, FCR and mortality of the fish were measured. At the end of the study, the blood of two fish per cage was sampled for the analysis of several immunity-related variables. The length of intestinal villi from the same fish was also measured.


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