search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
It’s kind of like Walt Disney looking at his plans for Disneyland before it was built. There is an idea, a dream, implementation, and then we learn how it will work and how to make it better.”


—Charles Ott, Fremont (California) Unified School District


A BUS DRIVER’S BUS  Entrance door and window area designed for maximum visibility  Engineered for easy maneuverability, comfort and operation


AERODYNAMIC  Signature aerodynamic design improves fuel efficiency  Trans Tech buses go further on a gallon of gas


UNMATCHED VERSATILITY


 Versa-Track seating system provides maximum versatility and safety


 Flat-floor option is perfect for wheelchair access


BUILT TO LAST  14 gauge galvanized steel pan-formed floors increase strength and resist corrosion


 Bolted safety-cage provides enhanced crash protection


Blue Bird propane buses with the funds. Te ROUSH-Blue Bird study also cites districts that adopted


propane buses in Boulder, Colorado; Cook County, Illinois; plus Detroit and Bibb County, Georgia. Bibb County School District saves about $3,000 per service per bus on its propane buses, compared to diesel. Tat’s because, in part, the propane buses use half the oil needed annually by diesel buses—21 versus 40 quarts. “Te maintenance and repair parts for propane aren’t as


heavy, making them less cumbersome,” said Bibb County School District Transportation Director Anthony Jackson, who is quoted in the study. “Plus, the propane engine is clean. It’s not covered with grease and grime like diesel engines often are.” Boulder Valley School District operates 266 buses, most of which are diesel. Te district estimates the diesel buses each cost $53.60 a day to operate, compared to $38.40 for its 27 propane buses. Meanwhile, three-quarters of Detroit Public School Community District’s fleet are Blue Bird Vision Propane buses, which use less oil and cost less in maintenance than diesel, according to the district. Proponents also say that propane buses may be better than diesel in cold weather, since they start more easily in the cold and better survive messy conditions. “In Chicago, there is a lot of salt put on the roads, due to all the snow,” said John Benish, Jr., CEO of school bus contractor Cook-Illinois Corporation, in the study. “All that diesel equipment—the diesel emission filters, diesel particulate filters, diesel oxidation catalyst, turbo chargers—is under the bus and gets frequently damaged.”


www.stnonline.com 51


PEACE OF MIND  Best in class 3-year 60,000 mile warranty protects your investment  Altoona Tested for Safety and Durability


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60