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PROPERTY


Is Society Ageist at Its Core?


Vanessa Pritchard-Wilkes, Head of Strategic Engagement at Housing 21, addresses the issue of institutional ageism within the UK.


When coining the term ageism in 1969, physician and author Robert Butler described one of its aspects as “institutional practices and policies and perpetuate stereotypes about older adults, that reduce their opportunity for life satisfaction and undermine their personal dignity.”


The average life expectancy in the UK is now 79 for men and 83 for women and, by 2066, people over the age of 65


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will make up 26% of the total population. This section of society is growing exponentially and is a rich untapped source, providing skills and experience that can benefit the workforce, as well as helping to address future skills shortages. Yet, more than 50 years aſter Robert Butler devised the term ageism, outdated prejudices about old people remain, leaving us with policies, perceptions and prejudices that are ageist at their core, to the detriment of huge sections of society.


https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/lifeexpectancies/bulletins/nationallifetablesunitedkingdom/2014to2016 https://www.rsph.org.uk/uploads/assets/uploaded/010d3159-0d36-4707-aee54e29047c8e3a.pdf https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165032715314142


www.tomorrowscare.co.uk


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