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ERED APPROACH environment. Elizabeth Butcher, Marketing Segment Manager – Healthcare at Tarkett UK, explains.


Highly reflective surfaces such as polished floors need to be avoided too: this can look like water to someone living with dementia. A matt finish helps residents move more easily and alleviates anxiety.


Recognisably natural textures like wood and lower-contrast flooring designs provide reassurance in such cases, as well as creating a familiar, homely ambience that improves wellbeing. Visual comfort, safety and motor stimulation are the major benefits residents derive from the careful use of light and colour in care homes.


EMPATHY TOOL To help flooring contractors and other professionals working in dementia-friendly facilities, Tarkett has adopted a cutting- edge Virtual Reality Empathy Platform – or VR-EP: a tool


twitter.com/TContractFloors


endorsed by leading experts in dementia design. By using the world’s only evidence-based dementia filter, users can understand how colour, contrast, texture and material play a key role in overcoming resident anxiety and slips, trips and falls by making spaces easier to navigate.


Crucially, dementia-friendly building projects need a holistic approach. Flooring, wall paint, lighting and furniture can’t be considered in isolation: the best dementia-friendly outcomes are achieved when contractors, suppliers and designers work together to ensure all elements work in sync.


Experience Tarkett’s VR-EP tool and learn more about dementia-friendly flooring here.


https://designingfordementia.tarkett.co.uk/ https://professionals.tarkett.co.uk/en_GB


HEALTHCARE | 31


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