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Lughaidh Kerin organises our Clinical Legal Education Course to help bridge the divide between law in the classroom and law in practice.


“The Middlesex University Legal Advice Centre helps people who aren’t able to afford other sources of legal advice. Volunteer students book appointments, speak with clients and then work with our solicitor to give legal advice. They help with housing, benefits, domestic violence, immigration, wills and probate, and more. It means our students know what will be expected of them and gain experience dealing with real-life issues. They often say that this is when the different strands of law they’ve read really come together.”


EXPERIENCE IN THE LEGAL FIELD


“The transition from theory to practice is a really important journey towards the profession. It provides students with the opportunity to get experience in the legal field as part of our broader Clinical Legal Education Course. It improves their chances of employment within the legal sector because they’re able to add strong academic performance together with a good record of practical skills.”


LUGHAIDH KERIN SENIOR LECTURER IN CLINICAL LEGAL EDUCATION – PRACTICE


Julia Haferkorn has twenty years of experience working in the music industry. She specialises in live music, with a particular interest in classical music.


“We give students so many opportunities to work with external organisations and they make the most of them. The Hanwell Hootie is London’s biggest non-ticketed music festival with 30,000 attendees. Some of our Music Business and Arts Management students work from October to May with their own roles. For example, they work on contracts for every single one of the 100 artists that perform. We have more than 20 students working on the day of the festival too. You experience what it’s like to work in the industry – that’s something you can’t replicate in the classroom. Doing it yourself really makes a difference. It looks amazing on their CV and they get amazing jobs afterwards. They all tell me that’s exactly what the interviewer asked them about.”


ONE FOOT IN INDUSTRY. ONE FOOT IN BUSINESS


“What really sets our students apart is that they have actually learnt theory as well. What they learn in lectures with their practical experience like at the wHootie – it’s a stepping stone into the industry. They’ve got one foot in university and one foot in business.


I’m proud of what we’re offering them because it isn’t a given. It is very rare for a university to collaborate with a music festival to such a degree.”


JULIA HAFERKORN SENIOR LECTURER IN MUSIC BUSINESS AND ARTS MANAGEMENT


MDX.AC.UK


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