search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
EDUCATION & SKILLS


Young people get to grips with the data world in a series of remote learning classes


Vast sensor network heralds new data dawn


Edinburgh University data experts are connecting schools to the Internet of Tings - equipping young people with tech skills for the future


South-east Scotland is about to pass a major milestone on its journey to becoming a more joined-up region. Sensors, data, and smart technology are being increasingly used to gather data from towns and communities and the University of Edinburgh has received £9.5m from the Edinburgh and South-east Scotland City Region Deal for a major Internet of Tings


(IoT) network across the region. IoT networks are physical objects


fitted with sensors and software to connect them and enable them to exchange data. Te network will be part of the university’s Data-Driven Innovation programme, its key deliv- erable as a city region deal partner. Te project will provide South- east Scotland with an IoT facility


24 | FUTURESCOT | SUMMER 2021


with tens of thousands of low-cost sensors using low-power and wide-area wireless networking (LoRaWAN). Te sensors will cover an area of 7,700km2


and monitor


the natural and built environment in real-time, including weather, bio- diversity, air/water quality, building safety, efficiency and energy use. Te first phase of the sensor


network is already established across the five main University of Edinburgh campuses. Tis enables wireless LoRaWAN connectivity with battery-powered sensors as far as 16km away in Fife. Simon Chapple, head of data


technology at the university says: “One of the most exciting aspects is the establishment of the sensor


network through the participation of the region’s 550-plus primary and high schools. Tis will intro- duce the secure and safe use of connected IoT sensors in the taught curriculum, aiding the develop- ment of data literacy.” A test installation of a LoRaWAN


radio gateway receiver and sensors has been successful in New- battle High School at Dalkeith in Midlothian. Te next big step is to deploy gateways and sensors to all schools across the region, which will roll out in phases from the end of this year and throughout 2022.


DRIVING DATA LITERACY Alongside the network’s technical capabilities, the possibilities for


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36