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EDUCATION & SKILLS Continued from Page 13


3 BILL BUCHANAN A computing science professor at Edinburgh Napier University, which last year was recognised by the Na- tional Cyber Security Centre for its commitment to delivering first-rate cybersecurity education, Buchanan is behind an extensive online en- vironment for schools in Scotland – Bright Red Books – which has over 120,000 registered users. Buchanan, who reached over 4,000 Scottish students in the past year with his virtual computing science lectures, has also won “best lecturer” in the School of Computing at Napier five times since 2011.


4 TONI MACKENZIE AND CLARA O’CALLAGHAN MacKenzie and O’Callaghan are the senior pupils behind Turing’s Tes- ters 2.0 – a programme supported by dressCode which aims to inspire the next generation of Scottish cyber talent and help close the gender gap. Te St Kentigern’s pupils are great advocates of STEM, run national competitions for students, speak at events, including the Women in Tech conference Edinburgh 2019, and have won various national awards for their efforts, such as the “cyber evangelist of the year” at the Scottish Cyber Awards.


5 CHARLIE LOVE Now quality improvement officer – digital at Aberdeen City Council, Love is a former computing science teacher who provides advice to the Scottish Government as part of the digital learning and teaching programme. In 2006, the curriculum innovator set up CompEdNet – a “hugely valuable” online community for Scottish com- puting science teachers, which he still runs. He led Aberdeen City’s digital learning response to the pandemic, which included use of live lessons with Google Workspace, and devel- oped guidance for the use of video for learning which was shared nationally.


6 JUDY ROBERTSON Computer scientist and learning technologist at Edinburgh Univer- sity, Roberston is chair in digital learning at the institute’s Moray House School of Education and a keen advocate for computing science at schools, responsible for several initiatives.


14 | FUTURESCOT | SUMMER 2021


7 GIB MCMILLAN Under McMillan’s innovative leader- ship as headteacher, Newbattle High School in Dalkeith, has become Scotland’s “first” digital centre for ex- cellence with close links to industry.


8 NICOLA ORR A primary teacher at Condorrat Primary School in Cumbernauld, Orr produces videos of industry experts answering questions about their jobs to help inspire pupils across the country into STEM.


9 TONY HARKIN Head of computing science at St Aloysius’ College in Glasgow, Har- kin compiles Computing Science Scotland in his spare time – a free magazine for teachers delivering the subject in Scotland.


10 LEWIS BINNIE A final year student at St Ken- tigern’s Academy, Binnie has designed infographics in his free time to help inspire pupils into computing science.


11 STEPHEN STEWART Head of computing science at Lochaber High School, in Fort William, Stewart is the creator of Smart School – a programme helping Scottish schools to make “great use of digital tools”.


12 DARREN BROWN A computing science teacher at Inverness High School, Brown is behind Computing Science Scot- land Google Drive, a “gold mine” of resources for teachers.


13 DEBBIE MCCUTCHEON Manager of Skills Development Scotland’s “tech industry in the classroom” project, part of the wider Digital World programmes, McCutcheon drives the relationship between students and industry to inspire uptake in digital careers.


14 FIONA MCNEILL Reader in computing science at Edinburgh University and lead of the Scottish Computing Science Committee, McNeill is a leading advocate of the subject in schools.


15 BRENDAN MCCART A computing science teacher of 35 years, McCart turns the latest trends in computing science into engag- ing lessons. When he first learned to program, he had to write Fortran code by hand on squared sheets and wait a week for the output.


16 SINÉAD FLANIGAN Computing science teacher at Uddingston Grammar in South Lanarkshire, Flanigan launched the NPA cyber security course at her school and delivers it to 33 students.


17 FRASER MCKAY Computing science teacher, McKay is the founder of Computing Sci- ence Scotland Meets – an online “teach meet” for teachers where they can share ideas and resources.


18 JAYNE MAYS A teacher at Fintry Primary in Dundee, Mays is a driver of digital innovation who runs a free coding club and is heavily involved in the “young STEM leader” programme.


Mark Logan, author of the Scottish Technology Ecosystem Review


19 MOLLY PLENDERLEITH An S4 pupil at St Kentigern’s Academy passionate about cyber security, Plender- leith has created a website – Reboot the Rules – with free cyber resources for primary school teachers.


20 KAREN MEECHAN AND NICOLA CRAWFORD Meechan, interim chief execu- tive of ScotlandIS and Crawford, programme director at Developing the Young Workforce Glasgow, are currently collaborating on a new initiative, “critical friends”, to sup- port teachers delivering comput- ing science and bridge the gap between industry and schools.


21 DECLAN DOYLE Head of ethical hacking at the Scottish Business Resilience Centre, Doyle is responsible for managing students enrolled in Abertay University’s ethical hack- ing course.


22 DR ELLA TAYLOR-SMITH AND DR MATTHEW BARR Senior research fellow at Ed- inburgh Napier University and


Clockwise from left: Bill Buchanan, Brendan McCart, Toni MacKenzie and Clara O’Callaghan, Nicola Orr, Charlie Love


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