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CHILDREN’S ROOMS The two children’s rooms share a Jack and Jill bathroom accessed via curved doors set into walls of storage


MAIN BEDROOM


Removing the ceiling created a vaulted main bedroom on the top floor with space for a mezzanine study


“There was a debate about whether the


children’s rooms should be on the top floor but, in the end, we chose to have our main bedroom and ensuite up there, with the boys on the next floor down,” he says. “They share a Jack and Jill bathroom, with curved white doors made by our builder, which disappear into the bedroom walls when they’re closed.”


Ash has been used for plank flooring, bespoke


internal doors, and joinery throughout the house, creating a cohesive feel, with ceramic floor tiles laid in high-traffic areas. “We have a habit of taking our shoes off in the entrance, so laying floor tiles in this area makes it easier to clean,” explains Nishant. “The same concrete- effect tile leads downstairs to the new kitchen, where in the hallway we have a wood floor.” Externally, 40 square metres of glass micro mosaic tiles on a modelled substrate were used to cover the 7 metre high back wall of the rear garden, to bounce light down to the lowest floors and provide a subtle, shimmering backdrop to the main living spaces in the house.


On the upper ground floor, the spacious sitting room features a contemporary three- sided glass gas fire, designed to supplement the underfloor heating. “It’s a very open space, and we knew this could potentially be the coldest room in the house, so we installed a powerful fire,” says Nishant. “It was an extravagance, but really warms the house and creates a lovely feel.”


may/june 2021


In contrast, the lower ground floor kitchen is the warmest area, and has been fitted with simple cabinetry and bespoke storage solutions, which retain the pared-back Scandinavian feel favoured by the couple. They chose speckled white Corian counter tops, with a large ash island which is where the family tend to spend much of their time. “Our builder created fantastic bespoke storage and furniture, such as the ash dressing table in our bedroom,” says Nishant. “We didn’t get physically involved at all with the project, but we did buy new furniture to suit the design and liaised with our architect when choosing things like the bathroom sanitaryware.” Overall, this extensive renovation project took almost three years to complete, with delays predominantly caused by the basement excavation. “Building a new house would have been significantly easier,” says Nishant. “We stayed living in our old house during the build, and got married, then went on to have our two sons. By the time the work was completed there were four of us moving in!” Noah is now five, Isaac is four, and the house has adapted well to a young family. “People are genuinely surprised when they first visit because it’s so traditional outside, but inside it’s white and contemporary,” says Nishant. “Living in a house designed specifically for us, with such bright interiors, has made a huge difference to our lives, and we appreciate being here every day.” 


www.sbhonline.co.uk 67


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