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‘One of a kind’ craft/artisan pieces will give your space personality


A DESIGN CHECKLIST Finally, remember your design checklist before starting on the kitchen design and fitout: •Use three interesting textures that reflect a contrast of materials, for walls, worktops, cabinetry door/drawer fronts such as mid gloss units, wood flooring, and a quartz worktop.


• Utilise an accent colour for the glass splashback. This can be quite wild, or a neutral that sits somewhere between the light door fronts and dark wood


may/june 2021


floor colour (a tone that blends and co- ordinates), possibly a taupe or a soft subtle grey.


•Ironmongery – match a gorgeous, contrast metal finish across the space – taps, handles, knobs, hooks, latches, coat pegs and plug sockets. Such functional details complete a room and will accent your own style, whether traditional, quirky or contemporary. To end, remember comfort underfoot. If the kitchen is large enough, you can always add a rug or runner to warm up a


wood or tiled floor. This will give another texture and colour and allow you to add pattern, whether a modern geometric or more traditional soft floral. When the kitchen links to the dining space, this again allows you to pick up a design reference and create cohesion, with a rug under the dining table and chairs. Rugs are natural space definers, making a visual frame for the dining table to sit upon.


Lucy Bartley is founder of lucyb home www.sbhonline.co.uk 11


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