search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
[INDUSTRY NEWS] Jay Schroeder, regional sales manager


at Caldwell, said: “The Starpoint gives safe alternative options to places where the end user needs a lifting point to swivel and maybe does not need the full versatility of a swivel load or hoist ring. Many times in the past, someone would try to make a four-point lift with a standard eyebolt. When you mount an eyebolt, you would get them in tight and they end up in four different orientations or the user would have to shim the eyebolt to try and get it in the correct orientation.” Schroeder, who oversees sales for RUD,


Caldwell and Renfroe products in the eastern half of the U.S. and Canada, added: “When you go to make a pick, eyebolts back out to the path of least resistance and are no longer ‘seated’. This puts undue stress on the bolts and will cause failure to the point of bending the eyebolt or ultimate failure of breaking it totally.” However, the VRS features the iconic


RUD star-shape, which adds strength versus a typical ring and gives the user direction on how far around the ring they can make a safe load. Working load limits (WLL) are stamped or forged on the product.


Schroeder said: “We tell the user that


they can make a pick from point to point. If they choose to make a true vertical lift from one [VRS] or different combinations using multiple units, they can access our WLL either online or in our catalog.” When using the VRS for lifting, the user


engages the installation tool in the hexagon socket screw and tightens it by hand, before disengaging the tool and making a lift. Schroeder explained that if the application is a one-time lift, the manufacturer recommends hand tightening, but if it is for a permanent location Caldwell provides torque values to set them to. The product is available in a myriad


of sizes: metric; imperial; longer bolts for metric; and even custom threads for special applications. The range spans M6 to M64 and 5/16 in. to 2 in. Notably, it also features radio-frequency identification (RFID). “RUD realizes that everyone has unique


lifting requirements,” added Schroeder. “We try to fill as many holes as we can to help the end user. Some may need the standard product; others may want it without the key


[tightening wrench] that comes as standard. It can be used in one-, two-, three- or four- piece configurations.” All RUD products are made to DIN, BG


and EN standards. y


Modulift’s CMOD 12 Spreader Frame Helps Dorian the ‘Little Ship’ from Dunkirk Get Ready to Return to the sea!


> Dorian, one of Dunkirk’s little ships, has been in restoration in Southampton since 2011. With the work now complete, the ship, which weighed 9.7 tonnes, was lifted back into the sea and is now ready to attend the Return of Dunkirk, an event to commemorate the 80th anniversary of Operation Dynamo in May 2020. A Modulift CMOD 12 Spreader Frame was used by SafetyLiftinGear for the lift of Dorian on the rather blustery morning of the 7th January 2020. Built for the Royal Navy in the historic Portsmouth Dockyard over 100 years ago in


CHICAGO HARDWARE & FIXTURE CO. AMERICAN MADE


FAMILY OWNED 9100 Parklane Avenue


Franklin Park, Illinois 60131 Phone: (847) 455-6609


Email: info@chicagohardware.com www.chicagohardware.com G


NEW ITEM


FEATURES: Single Piece Forging Made in USA


CHF Forged Into Each Part Product Traceability


ISO 9001:2015 certified


10


MAY–JUNE 2020


WIRE ROPE EXCHANGE


C


I


H


L


I


C


C


A


I


G


R O


P


SOLD IN BULK ASSEMBLED


5/16" + 3/8"


P


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85