search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
44 PROJECT REPORT: CULTURAL, CIVIC & FAITH BUILDINGS


“It’s like an instrument, you are designing an instrument for the orchestra”


Christina Seilern, Studio Seilern Architects


© Roland Halbe ALPINE INSPIRATION


The foyer continues the ‘origami-like’ forms of the hall, with a gold polycarbonate and metal wall inspired by Alpine glaciers


Due to planning restrictions on the site, only some of the roof could be raised, this meant that the original configuration of the stage area would have been awkwardly constrained. So the designers placed the stage in the centre of the hall instead, giving symmetry to the space as well as acoustic benefits. This is enhanced by the two elegant pairs of angled white steel columns, framing the stage and reappearing at the ground floor entrance to support the roof. Christina Seilern comments on the stage


design: “It creates an acoustic pocket for the orchestra to sit in – to me what was really important was to sit the audience around the orchestra and envelop it.” She says that when the space is this intimate, and if you “wrap people around the orchestra,” everyone “has a good seat,” in terms of both visuals and acoustics. In addition, the central stage position means the foyer is a ‘crossover space’, which can be used by the orchestra during performances.


Behind the stage is a wall of expanded aluminium, designed to provide acoustic reflection in certain areas to help the musicians hear themselves. In others however it is more transparent, providing absorption, so that players of louder instruments don’t overwhelm themselves. Behind this sits air


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


© Kanipak Photography


exhaust ducting – one area where the heavily serviced space discreetly accommodates its copious M&E plant. The hall is flexible – a stepped platform of up to nine rows can disappear under the main balcony to create space for events.


The building is designed to strict Swiss ‘Minergie’ energy efficiency standards, however with it being completely shaded by nearby buildings, solar gain was not a concern. What was a challenge was accommodating the M&E services required without any acoustic interference; this meant a redesign of the original services strategy with bigger ducts and lower velocities. The timber-faced balcony’s deep form not only attenuates, it also hides what Seilern says are “enormous” ducts, which vent conditioned air from openings underneath the seating.


Foyer & entrance The entrance is a small, round pavilion that was already built as part of the hotel, with a door added by the architects for off-street access. Once inside, visitors descend the “origami well,” as Seilern describes it, down a stair, whose pre-existing concrete core now houses the foyer. A mezzanine gallery was added here to provide added space for bars and circulation, and the golden


ADF JANUARY 2020


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84