search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PROJECT REPORT: CULTURAL, CIVIC & FAITH BUILDINGS


portion, underneath the roof, whose timber- lined overhang is deep enough to create a public plaza beneath. The glass has been specified according to the acoustician’s requirements to deal with 50 dB, and actually contributes its reflective properties usefully to the space. Christina Seilern’s very first sketch for the scheme, informed by her knowledge of designing other concert halls, included three suspended acoustic sculptures in the hall. Although this scheme progressed to a single form at one point, it has ended up with something very similar to her intuitive vision – partly due to pragmatic concerns around needing to hold water in a single sculpture for sprinklers. Winches enable the three final forms to move up and down as required for different performances. With a world-class concert hall, Seilern explains, it is not a finished article at completion, “you are constantly tuning it.” She adds that the designers are gathering feedback from musicians, and return with the acousticians to tweak design elements.


Seilern describes the careful process which led to choosing the final glazing surrounding the sculptures, but which also provides the upper face of the concert hall itself: “We had to test it at different sound frequencies because the acoustician wanted 50 dB at certain sound frequencies but not others, and had to work with the manufacturer to get the right kind of glass.” The solution of a triple-glazed operable facade with a single insulating layer “completely opened up the whole project and liberated it,” says the architect. “It made it transparent and light, it didn’t feel like a clunky, complex facade.” This was a major improvement on the “hugely complicated triple-layer facade” that was initially proposed, says Seilern. This was expensive but also had issues around transparency. An electronically-controlled curtain closes across the glass to enable conferences or evening parties to take place in greater privacy.


Acoustics & staging The undulating ‘origami-like’ ceiling and wall design was devised by the architects working closely together with Kahle acoustics to create the best possible sonic results; in so doing it also provides an appealing visual geometry. The strips of white oiled oak, arranged in a pattern of triangular sections, are thinner as the building rises, and subtly change from something closer to white to a yellower shade.


“Everything has been angled for the ideal ADF JANUARY 2020


43


acoustic reflection,” says Seilern, adding: “It’s like an instrument, you are designing an instrument for the orchestra.” The interior has been painstakingly designed to optimise reflection and absorption from orchestra to audience in the right places, and the calculations have resulted in interesting forms such as the inclined balconies. The dynamic interior, with views up to tree-covered mountains, enhances the entire experience to an immersive level, helped by the suspended reflectors designed to achieve the perfect auditory balance. The ceiling is striped with “technical


strips” which discreetly house smoke detectors, lights and around 260 speakers and over 120 microphones – for the PA system. The building is designed for an orchestra to require no audio assistance, but does have an ‘electro-acoustic’ system to slightly increase reverberation time to optimise acoustics for larger orchestras.


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


CLOUD FORMATIONS


Closely resembling project architect Christina Seilern’s original sketch for the project are three ‘cloud-like’ fibreglass acoustic sculptures, suspended from wires and finished in a pale colour


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84