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2019 Hall of Honor Inductees


HALL OF HONOR


BARRY HADLEY


Hadley has spent his lifetime in the investment casting industry. From his origins as a wax room supervisor at Design Precision Casting to his ownership of O’Fallon Casting, he has always dreamed of ways to employ emerging technologies to the betterment of the industry. In 1963, Hadley, with his two


partners, Al Rice (Cercon) and Erik Knospel


(Artcast), made the bold


decision to found Mid Canadian Investment Casting Ltd.


When Mid


Canadian merged into Cercast, he became president of Cercor (Howmet- Georgetown). There, in collaboration with such notables as Frank Valenta, George Muri, Elmar Heimbach and Herb Stoll, he pursued the vision of the modern foundry, pioneering technologies such as robotics and computer systems. Under his guidance, Cercor grew to become one of the largest and most technologically advanced non-ferrous investment casting foundries of its day. In 2003, Hadley left Howmet-


Georgetown to purchase O’Fallon Casting from Hitchiner Manufacturing. Since then, O’Fallon’s sales have realized consistent growth, employment has doubled and the facility has recently undergone a 25,000 sq. foot expansion. His revitalization of the operation and his technological contributions to the industry has become one of the greatest stories in the foundry industry.


®


TED KLEMP With a career spanning half a century, Ted Klemp made his mark on the industry that he loved, but also on those who knew him. He had the good fortune to work for a number of recognized companies in the industry, including Howmet Corporation, Sealed Power, Cannon Muskegon and Remelt Sources. In 1992, he started Cayenne Systems as a metallurgical consulting company which he grew to have over 100 customers in the US, Europe and New Zealand. Having a special understanding of


alloy element interaction, Klemp could not only offer foundries better alloy formulations, but he could explain the mechanics of interactions in a way that non-metallurgists could understand. This


innate ability to communicate


technical topics to a diverse audience and ensure understanding made him a valuable asset to the industry and the ICI as a Certification Course instructor. Klemp wrote and presented numerous technical papers for the ICI and was the recipient of the “Best Paper Award” in 1983, 1986, 1987 and 1988. Known as the “go to guy” to identify


and solve technical problems, Klemp’s volunteer efforts went well beyond the ICI, as he actively worked with the AFS, Western Michigan University and Muskegon Community College. He was known and respected by everyone in the business.


JERRY SNOW Snow’s career can be characterized as being one of industry contributions from his early days at Ferr and TRW Casting through the time that he spent at PCC Structurals and Minco.


His focus has


always been one of adding value to the industry, which his career exemplifies. Snow is recognized for the


development of a number of investment cast alloys, HP Polymer and Minco Fast Dry. He also developed the Permeability/ Burst Test and the Fish Scale Test, both of which are detailed in the ICI Handbook. Among his many contributions, he is also recognized for authoring and presenting 9 technical papers and the Shell Training Program for the ICI. Always willing to share his


knowledge of the industry, he worked with industry colleagues to develop their skill sets regardless of company affiliation. Many of today’s industry professionals were mentored by Snow, a number of which attest that they owe their success to him.


November 2019 ❘ 9


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