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REGULATORY REVIEW


Patient Access Rule expands on the cur- rent administration’s policy priorities. In March 2018, CMS Administra-


tor Seema Verma announced two new initiatives—My Health eData and Blue Button


2.0—aimed at empowering


ria—EHI export and Application Pro- gramming Interfaces (APIs) are being proposed. Finally, to show support for health IT across the care continuum, ONC asserts recommendations for the voluntary certification of HIT by pedi- atric providers, noting the 2015 Edi- tion criteria that best support care in pediatric settings.


For more information on the pro- posed rule visit the ONC website at www.healthit.gov.


Interoperability and Patient Access Rule


Whereas the Information Blocking Rule expands the regulatory framework set forth in the previous laws and reg- ulations, CMS’ Interoperability and


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patients by giving them greater control over their healthcare data. The initia- tives were a direct response to President Donald Trump’s October 2017 Execu- tive Order 13813: Promoting Health- care Choice and Competition Across the United States. In her address announc- ing the initiatives, Verma asserted that empowering patients, that is allow- ing them to “make their own decisions based on quality and value,” is the key to reducing overall healthcare costs. Blue Button 2.0 is an extension of an ongoing federal initiative started in 2010, which gave patients a simple, user-friendly mechanism to download their personal healthcare data. The spe- cific information varies by payer (i.e., the Department of Defense’s TRICARE or Aetna) but can include information from a medical record, medications, lab results and claims information. Blue Button 2.0 extends this capability to developers working with Medicare enrollees, giving any developer the abil- ity to integrate their platform with four years of health data from Medicare’s 53 million beneficiaries. One year after Verma’s announce- ment, details are much scanter on My Health eData. The initiative involves a few governmental agencies and has the broad goal of giving patients “true control of their own health records from the device or application of their choice.” The proposals contained in this year’s Interoperability and Patient Access Rule give some visibility into the regulatory framework for achiev- ing that goal. Entities subject to the rule’s proposals are generally limited to Medicaid and CHIP Fee-For-Ser- vice (FFS) programs/state agencies, Medicare Advantage (MA) organiza- tions, Medicaid and CHIP Managed care entities and Qualified Health


34 ASC FOCUS JUNE/JULY 2019 | ascfocus.org


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