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MAPPLEWELL


Historical Mapplewell


Once a small hamlet, the charming village of Mapplewell has developed into a bustling community and is home to a range of independent businesses.


The area is steeped in history and full of character, serving the close community well with its abundance of local amenities and services.


Deeds suggest that Mapplewell, Carr Green and Swallow Hill were inhabited as early as 1300 by serfs who were tied to the land and worked for great land owners. Prominent occupations changed considerably in the village over the years from farming, to nailmaking and more latterly coal mining.


The pithead gear, once a prominent land mark towering


Pye Avenue NOW


over the village, is a distant memory and the site is now home to the Co-Operative store along with a range of modern day industrial and residential buildings.


Many new home developments are currently being built, which will increase the existing population of 4,000 and cement Mapplewell as a thriving community for many years to come.


Pye Avenue THEN


Towngate NOW


Towngate THEN


A piece of history nailed down


The making of nails was once an ancient handcraft in the industrial village of Mapplewell, vital to the local economy it was the trade of many Barnsley folk.


During the 17th Century, changes in farming methods meant that fewer farm labourers were required and nail making became an increasingly popular occupation. For four months of the year there would be less to do on the farm and coal was in abundance, much of it close to the surface of the ground. Making nails was a second string to the farmers bow but it soon took priority.


Nails were among the first metal objects made by mankind, indispensable for such everyday items as doors and roof coverings, shoes, buckets and barrels. Early nails were usually square in section and they had to be made by hand at the forge, which was an intricate and time consuming process.


An intricate craft An Iron rod was heated in the


forge until is was red hot, at which point it was drawn out to the required length with a hammer and the softened tip made into a


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Supplying top quality, locally produced meat Homemade sausages, pies and pasties


1 GREENSIDE, MAPPLEWELL, BARNSLEY, S75 6AU Telephone. 01226 382267


C BIRKINSHAW Third generation family Butcher


Proud to have been established for over 100 years


square point. After re-heating the rod to scorching hot, each singular nail was cut to the required length. One nail at a time was heated and laboriously pounded out to shape with a hammer on an anvil. As they were expensive to produce, they were fairly valuable. Ruined buildings were often burned before nails were scavenged from the ashes to reuse.


Early nails had two types of heads, though being hand-forged, the variety of shapes and forms was infinite. A round head was used for general purpose fastening with a head above the surface of wood. Four or five hammer blows created a shape referred to as a rose head, for its resemblance to the petals of the flower. A T-head was driven below the surface and used for finished work such as clasping or flooring.


The reason for the development of an industry making objects from iron was largely due to the local geology. A seam of ironstone runs


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