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36 5 6


Learn some yoga asanas To spring clean your mind and body now is a great time to learn some yoga asana


poses. If you don’t know a tree pose from a downward dog there are a rapidly rising


number of beginner classes springing up around the South Hams. Kingsbridge’s Harbour House has been holding yoga classes for years; Simply Soulful, also in Kingsbridge, offers a huge range of classes including some quirky ones, such as yoga on stand up paddleboards and surrounded by goats. The goats don’t actually do the poses - they are there to exert an extra sense of calm. The Flavel in Dartmouth hosts many yoga classes and in Totnes you can’t get down the high street without tripping over yoga studios, including The Forge Yoga Centre, voted one of the best in the world no less. Check out Zest Yoga’s advert on page 80. For those a little nervous about yoga, due to back issues etc, check out The Yoga Physios, who’ll put you on the straight and narrow before you get started. neering. There’s a kid’s area too, with craft activities to keep them entertained.


Ride the Babbacombe Cliff Railway – for free! Torquay’s Babbacombe Cliff Railway is celebrating its tenth anniversary of community ownership on May 11. To thank everyone for their support over the last decade the railway is inviting everyone to travel up and down the funicular railway for free all day. Park up at Babbacombe Downs and take in the glorious panoramic view then hop on the railway down to Oddicombe Beach, for a stroll and drink in the café. The railway has been taking people to the beach and back since 1926. It’s open every day and operates between 9am and 5pm. A bell is rung to warn everyone on the beach before the last service of the day. But there’s a path back up the cliff if you forget or choose to stay longer!


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Visit the Devon County Show Dubbed the ‘cream of Devon’ the county


show really is one of the South West’s premier


agricultural shows. This year it’s on May 16, 17 and 18. Every day there’s a packed programme of entertain- ment in the main arena, including top class show jumping; motorbike stunt display team; Shetland pony performance team; and falconry display. There are also more than 2,000 animals in the livestock competitions, including sheep, cattle, pigs, goats and alpacas and over 100 rare and minority breeds. And, of course, there’s the food and drink pavilion with an incredible array of things to sample and buy, and Devon’s best chefs demonstrating recipes. There’s also the popular crafts and gardens pavilion – a giant marquee that is bigger than a Premier League football pitch and home to many stalls and art, craft and gar- dening competitions. You can also find displays of vintage tractors and steam engines; a bees and honey marquee; craft beers and ciders; rabbit and guinea pig shows; and one of the biggest dog shows in the West Country.


Eat a crab sandwich at Salcombe Crab Festival This lovely festival celebrates the infamous Cancer


Pagurus (brown crab) caught by the Salcombe fleet and widely regarded as the best crab in the world. Salcombe Crab Festival, otherwise known as Crabfest, is a wonderful annual celebration of this crustacean, alongside the local fishing, food and tourism industries. It takes place May 5th. The day is organised by the town’s Rotary Club and at- tracts thousands of visitors, so grab that crab sandwich quick. Salcombe will be buzzing with live music; food and drink stalls; cookery demon- strations; artisan crafts, clothing and gifts; and other lots of other activities. Entry is free and funds raised by the festival are donated to local charities and good causes.


©Norsworthy photography


Devon County Show © geograph-2421394-by-Lewis-Clarke


Babbacombe Cliff Railway cc-by-sa:2.0 - © Chris Allen - geograph.org.uk:p:4618513


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