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achieved through our focus on mooring optimisation. A number of


The latest news, keeping residents and harbour users up to date.


customers received a 5% discount on their annual mooring charge as a result of responding to requests for notice of absence during peak periods. We will be asking again for notice of absence during peak season for some of the more popular moorings (pontoons) so watch out for our messages if you have a pontoon berth.


Capt. Mark Cooper


Despite some challenging weather Dart Harbour’s winter maintenance schedule has gone well and will come to an end in May as we finish maintenance of private moorings, a few commercial maintenance jobs and move onto final preparations for the 2019 summer season. Having personally seen most the annual Dart Harbour routines at least twice now I am hoping to continue to improve the service to our customers and strengthen the links to our stakeholder base. One of the changes we


introduced in 2018 was the introduction of the annual renewal fee. This gave us the opportunity to understand earlier who would be giving up moorings, so we had time to reallocate those moorings for the coming year. This fee introduction has proved successful and we are now allocating more of the mooring give ups to those on our waiting list (rather than keeping them as temporaries for 12 months before normal allocation). We have been able to keep the annual increase in charges below the forecast for Retail Price Index (RPI) owing to increased income


Optimising moorings’ use contributes to increased fees income, helping us to keep annual increases to a minimum.


The location of the Stoke Gabriel Low Water landing


Preparation for the season The biggest change in our infrastructure for 2019 has been the replacement of the strip of DB pontoons (the inside strip on the Dartmouth side just below the higher ferry). We hope to continue the replacement of our older pontoons to bring them all up to a higher safety standard and reduce the risk to the environment from degradation of materials. The new Stoke Gabriel Low Water landing proved to be very popular last season and remained in place over winter. This pontoon does not allow access to the shore at highwater when the shore line path to the village is inaccessible owing to the height of water here (see pages 19 and 41 of the 2019 Dart Harbour Guide for details). Other seasonal pontoons including the Dart Yacht club pontoon and the Dittisham pontoon extension continue to be popular with our stakeholders and visitors and will be put in place again this spring.


Safety We strive to continue to improve safety on the river and by and large the majority of initiatives appear to be working well. However, there remains a core of river users who continue to operate with unnecessarily increased risk to themselves and other river users. In some cases, risk is increased


by a wilful disregard for byelaws (speeding and wake affects) and we know that sadly, changing the attitudes of the small number of people involved will not be easy. It is possible to make some simple changes to your routines and procedures that will significantly reduce your own risk, the most obvious safety tips include: ● Wearing lifejackets or buoyancy aids when afloat.


● Ensuring vessels are secure and stable before alighting.


● Attaching a hand held VHF to your lifejacket (particularly when single handed).


● Telling someone when you are expected back.


As the weather improves it is good


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