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118 SPONSORED BY PREMIER NOSS ON DART


TRAINING The RNLI Dart volunteers constant- ly train for their roles in both the B and D class lifeboats. Capsizing the boat or being swept overboard are situations that are taken very seri- ously. A specially adapted ‘D class capsize boat’ will be at the station for the first three weeks of May. If a D class lifeboat turns completely upside down the crew immediately scramble back on board, take hold of ropes attached under the far side of the boat, lean back and pull the boat up and over once again (see photo). Once back on board the outboard engine is primed and is specially adapted to restart with a hand pull. The crew also carry individual


Personal Locator Beacons which can locate them to within a few metres for rescue services, such as other lifeboats and Coastguard he- licopters, responding to the signal.


NEWS FROM THE RNLI LIFEBOAT TEAM IN DARTMOUTH The B class lifeboat carries an


inflatable balloon on the A frame over the engine which will right the lifeboat when a toggle is pulled. Six of the Dart B class helms are spend- ing two days each at the Lifeboat College in Poole practising this in the Sea Survival Pool. The crew also practise with other


life-saving groups so that when they are called to an emergency both teams are aware of each other’s capabilities. In early April an exercise was set up by the Paignton and Brixham Fire Service teams. A boat was presumed to be on fire at the Premier Marina at Noss. Two casualties were burnt and were still on the boat. Another two were thrown overboard by the blast and had to be found and brought to shore. The fire crews dealt with the casualties ashore, performed first aid and stretchered them to safety. The two lifeboat crews were tasked


by the Coastguard to search the marina, retrieve any ‘bodies’ and to bring them ashore to the care of the Fire teams.


COASTGUARD HELICOPTER UPDATE. Bristow Helicopters recently introduced two of the new Augusta Westland helicopters to operate from their base at St. Athan in south Wales. This is the base that covers our area. The AW189s are outfitted in a SAR configuration and feature the red and white coastguard livery. The cost of one helicopter is £20 million. The 8 tonne aircraft is twin engined and has a retractable tri- cycle landing gear. The helicopters feature full icing protection, radar, auto hover, night vision systems and infra-red cameras, and are capable of a 165-knot max speed over four hours’ endurance. The coastguard’s helicopter fleet


renewal plan was established in 2015 after a £1.9 billion, 10-year investment contract from the UK government to Bristow. Bristow was awarded the


contract to deliver SAR operations for the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) in 2013. It has taken over seven out of ten civilian SAR bases from the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy. A familiarisation and winching


photo by Riki Bannister Dart Assistant Lifeboat Press Officer


exercise was held for the lifeboat crews in the grounds of Britan- nia Royal Naval College, along with members of the Dartmouth Coastguard SAR team and Aviation cadets from the Naval College.


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