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50 APPOINTMENTS & COMPANY NEWS; GROUNDWORKS & DRAINAGE; STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS


Sika and Partners celebrate winning project in first-ever AJ Specification Awards


are celebrating following a win at the first-ever AJ Specification Awards. The roof refurbishment of the Central


S


Building at Cambridge University’s Fitzwilliam College came out on top in the Roofing and Drainage category. Announced at a ceremony held at The Principal Hotel in Manchester on Friday 15 February, prizes were taken home across a total of 12 categories for projects demonstrating outstanding working relationships between architects, manufacturers and suppliers. In what was a skilful collaboration between


Sarnafil, Cullinan and RCC, the judges agreed there was something special about the way this unique brutalist building had been beautifully protected. Comprising protruding ‘scalloped’ detailing,


an innovative waterproofing solution was created to refurbish the highly complex roof, all


without visually altering the original 1960s Denys Lasdun design. Sika Sarnafil’s single ply membrane and Sikalastic 621 – a liquid-applied product typically used for areas with complex detailing – were used across large areas. This pairing of systems was further enhanced by Sika Refurbishment’s SikaFloor 420. Sika Limited’s concrete products were also specified for the build by concrete repair contractors Gunite Eastern. Sika’s innovative concrete repair system included a steel corrosion inhibitor. Sika®


FerroGard®


ingle ply roofing manufacturer Sika Sarnafil, architects Cullinan Studio and Roofing Contractors Cambridge (RCC)


of the reinforcing steel, was used alongside Sika MonoTop®


was finished with Sikagard®


repair mortars. The concrete -550W, a


high-performance anti-carbonation coating, with crack-bridging capabilities, that protects the concrete, while meeting the aesthetic requirements of the structure. Sika has a wide range of products available


-903+,


which penetrates the concrete and forms a protective monomolecular layer on the surface


Connecting the construction industry


The way we build is changing. From architects to contractors to manufacturers, we are all facing challenges as building norms are evolving like never before. So what are these challenges and how


is the industry responding? This event provides key insight from leading players across a spectrum of specialities within the construction industry. This is an exclusive opportunity to join and network with professionals from across the industry (including David Wigglesworth, managing director of SFS UK) to discuss the next generation of construction, with topics covering the future of architecture, developing and nurturing new talent, diversifying the workforce and construction 4.0.


www.sfsintec.co.uk Helifix repairs restore failed arches


Hook Norton Brewery in Oxfordshire was suffering from internal and external cracking due to the failure of 15 brick arches. HeliBars were bonded into mortar beds above each opening, forming masonry beams that reinforced the brickwork, supported the wall above and spread the loads. Other cracks were


stitched using single HeliBars bonded across the cracks. These sympathetic repairs efficiently and economically restored integrity while retaining the original materials and aesthetics of this important listed structure. For project-specific technical advice about the use of Helifix structural repair systems, contact the Helifix team.


020 8735 5200 www.helifix.co.uk


for most applications within the construction industry, which can range from waterproofing, flooring, concrete, sealing and bonding, facade, roofing and refurbishment applications, as well as teams of specialists available to advise on specific projects. Using a combination of systems, while working internally within the company, Sika was able to advise on the most suitable materials for different aspects of the project and ultimately provided a complete building envelope solution, with the client benefitting from having only one supplier to deal with.


01707 394444 gbr.sika.com Snows Timber takes brand new direction


Snows Timber, previously part of The Bradfords Group, has announced the completion of a Management Buy Out, led by Managing Director, Ian Church. Ian, alongside Craig Willoughby, Supply Chain Director, and Adam Cray, Finance Director


had their bid for a management buyout approved by The Bradford’s Group in January 2019 and have since been busy completing the deal. Ian Church, Snows Timber’s Managing Director, said: “In our customer service proposition, we aim to be the very best in our sector. What excites us the most is the fact we are now truly independent.”


01604 340 380 www.snowstimber.com Redeveloping Commercial Buildings


When redeveloping buildings for uses such as gyms, coffee shops, mini shopping malls etc, improvements to washroom facilities can often be restricted by the location of gravity drainage. The simple solution is a floor mounted EffluMaxi pumping system from Pump Technology Ltd. Over the past 27 years, these proven units, the most


common commercial wastewater and sewage pumping solution of their kind in the UK, have been successfully installed in thousands of locations. Reliable facilities are a must, that’s why these stations are found in operation at Costa Coffee shops throughout the country.


www.pumptechnology.co.uk


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF APRIL 2019


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