search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
30 PROJECT REPORT: CULTURAL, CIVIC & FAITH BUILDINGS


© Iwan Baan


© Iwan Baan PROMINENT


The site (MK Gallery visible near centre of pic) is prominent, marking where the eastern edge of the town centre meets the green space of Campbell Park


The new building is simple, but precisely crafted, with an enormous 11.8 metre- wide hole cut in it, its top half glazed to visually connect the building with the landscape


investigated the story of the town, including its 60s ‘utopian’ ideals, “you realise what it succeeded in doing, and where the vision was compromised.”


The town is being seen with fresh eyes, the architect believes. “Its fortunes are changing, from being the subject of ridicule – roundabouts and concrete cows – it’s being revisited, people are realising it had fantastic potential, that is still unfulfilled.” The recent re-opening of the enlarged and greatly improved gallery, facing the eastern edge of the famous shopping centre, is a key stage in the town’s renaissance. In 2012 the gallery’s director Anthony


Spira, fresh from another cutting edge contemporary art gallery, The Whitechapel in east London, decided he needed to expand MK for its 20th birthday. Although the gallery already had a strong reputation, its audience was “quite small,” says Emerson. “Anthony wanted to create a much broader audience, and a local one,” and the means to this end would include bringing in much bigger exhibitions, particularly “historic shows.”


6a were appointed to design the publicly funded scheme based on the practice’s strong portfolio of gallery projects, including Raven Row, Spitalfields, South London gallery, Sadie Cole’s London Gallery, and the fashion galleries at the V&A. The modest £7m budget came via a combination of local council, Arts Council


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


© Iwan Baan


and SEMLEP local growth fund cash, and competing practices had to present to “quite a big selection panel,” says Emerson. This was then followed by a feasibility study which looked at the client’s desired programme, which was “quite fluid for a long time,” says Emerson. For example, extended discussions took place around whether more than one cinema would be desirable in a new multi-purpose auditorium/performance space. This changing picture was challenging for the architects, particularly when they had no guarantee they would be chosen to take the scheme to completion, or that it would be given Arts Council funding, until it was officially green-lighted.


“There were big questions around what’s the best sort of revenue, and best sort of community outreach,” Emerson explains. He continues, “We were looking at lots of options, producing data.” This led to a range of models, including physical as well as digital versions. “The building was getting bigger and smaller all the time.” The site is important and highly visible, marking where the eastern edge of the town centre meets the green space of Campbell Park. Right at the end of main central axis Midsummer Boulevard, that runs from the station to the park, it’s a location which gave 6a the opportunity to tap into some quintessential Milton Keynes design inspiration.


ADF APRIL 2019


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92