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COVER STORY


ventionist (CAIP) credential, every breakout session block on Thursday, May 16, and Friday, May 17, offers the choice of an infection prevention ses- sion (look for the aqua “infection pre- vention session” label on the online schedule). Attendees can earn up to 10.75 Infection Prevention


Contact


Hours (IPCHs)—more than the total required to sit for the CAIP exam. “If you are considering pursuing the CAIP credential, the meeting is a perfect opportunity to receive edu- cation and training that will help you more effectively prepare for the exam,” says Deborah Mack, CASC, founder of Quality and Risk Solutions (QRS) in Littleton, Colorado.


10 Things to Do in Nashville


Welcome to Music City for the ASCA 2019 Conference & Expo at the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center. Nashville offers a plethora of activities in and around the meeting venue. Between sessions at the conference and networking during social events, consider stepping out of the Gaylord to ex- plore the city.


1. Visit the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum 2. Catch a show at the Grand Ole Opry 3. Tour the Ryman Auditorium—and maybe record a song 4. Take in The Parthenon, a full-scale replica of the original Athens building 5. Stop into RCA Studio B, where Elvis Presley cut Heartbreak Hotel 6. Enjoy the furnishings, artwork and statuary of the Belmont Mansion 7. Stuff your face on the Walk Eat Nashville food tour


8. Shop in neighborhoods that include East Nashville, Downtown, 12South, Hillsboro Village, Germantown and 8th Avenue


9. Swing into the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum 10. Dance the night (and day) away on the Honky Tonk Highway


Mack will present the session


“Make Your Infection Preventionist a Full Partner in Your Safety and Quality Programs” on Thursday, May 16, from 9:10–10:10 am. “My session will dive into the regulations of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services con- cerning an ASC’s infection prevention program,” she says. “We will cover the critical components of an infection control plan, the responsibilities of an ASC infection preventionist and how this role can be effectively incorpo- rated into an ASC’s quality program.”


can help your ASC play a more signif- icant role in addressing this national crisis (read the February 2019 issue of this magazine to learn more about the opioid crisis). ASCA’s main program offers attend- ees the opportunity to earn up to 17.50 Administrator Education Units (AEU) for the Certified Administrator Surgery Center (CASC) credential and up to 17.50 nursing contact hours. Additional


12 ASC FOCUS MARCH 2019| ascfocus.org


AEUs and contact hours are available during the pre-conference workshops.


Highlight on Infection Prevention ASC professionals looking for infec- tion prevention education will not be disappointed. Whether you are looking for guidance and resources to launch or strengthen an infection prevention program or are planning to test for the Certified Ambulatory Infection Pre-


Numerous Networking Opportunities Along with an educational schedule jam-packed with critical content deliv- ered by experienced ASC manage- ment professionals, ASCA 2019 offers attendees plenty of time to make con- nections with their colleagues. “This conference is an excellent time to network with peers who truly understand what you do every day,” Lambert says. “It will help you to refill your cup and reenergize you so that you can continue to provide excellent care and leadership in your ASC.” The meals in the exhibit hall, recep- tions on the evenings of Wednesday, May 15, and Thursday, May 16, and breaks scattered throughout the sched- ule will provide numerous chances to


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