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ABOUT ROUNDABOUT


PEEKING THROUGH THE CURTAIN: STORIES FROM THE ARCHIVES


The complex subject of brothers has been addressed in plays throughout Roundabout’s history. Most recently, in the 2017 production of Arthur Miller’s The Price (which had an earlier revival at Roundabout in 1992), we examined the fraught relationship between the Franz brothers as money and parental caretaking set the siblings at odds. In our 2016 staging of Eugene O’Neill’s A Long Day’s Journey Into Night, brothers James and Edmund Tyrone exposed the ways brothers can be opposites in term of temperament, looks, and ambition, but still care deeply for one another despite those differences. And perhaps the play that examines the brother dynamic most powerfully was the 2013 production of Joshua Harmon’s Bad Jews, one that gives voice to the unspoken conflicts that can exist between brothers, when Liam and Jonah (with cousin Daphna as the catalyst) explode in a debate arising from differences in religion, politics, and world-view.


Mark Ruffalo and Tony Shalhoub in Arthur Miller's The Price


For more information on the Roundabout Archives, visit https://archive.roundabouttheatre.org/


or contact Tiffany Nixon, Roundabout Archivist, at archives@roundabouttheatre.org STAFF SPOTLIGHT: INTERVIEW WITH ANTONIO ROMERO, REPORTING & ANALYSIS ASSOCIATE


Ted Sod: Tell us about yourself. Where were you born and educated? How and when did you become the marketing department’s Reporting and Analysis Associate? Antonio Romero: I was born and raised in North Bergen, New Jersey. I went to college at Monmouth University, where I gained a bachelor’s degree in Theatre Arts. Upon graduation I moved to Washington, D.C. and spent a year doing an apprenticeship in theatre, where I learned more about ticketing. Once my apprenticeship ended I started a position as a sales office representative at a theatre company. After four years in Washington, D.C. I moved back to New Jersey, and I came to work at Roundabout.


TS: Describe your job at RTC. What are your responsibilities? AR: As the Reporting and Analysis Associate, I support other departments by presenting them with sales information. I also report on how our marketing efforts perform. In addition, I pull statements each morning reporting what sales were made the previous day. My position is a different side of marketing—it is a numbers and charts side.


TS: What is the best part of your job? What is the hardest part? AR: The best part of my job is being able to help inform decisions with the knowledge of past information. It helps us project sales and trends to the best of our ability with factual data. The hardest part is realizing not everything can be accounted for. There are outside influences we cannot always predict that can change the plan that we have set.


TS: Why do you choose to work at Roundabout? AR: Roundabout is a great place to work. Not only is it at the forefront of theatre, but it has such rich history. I also love its dedication to new works and fostering relationships with the next generation of artists. There are also so many great people who work at this institution.•


Learn more at roundabouttheatre.org. Find us on: TRUE WEST UPSTAGE GUIDE 23


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