search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
and he’s a dark horse whose odds are 19/1. The return on those odds for the same investment would be much higher and potentially a bigger payday for Saul.


TS: What do you look for from a director when rehearsing a role? GW: Trust is essential. Getting on stage in front of an audience of people you don’t know and speaking lines isn’t easy. And allowing myself to be vulnerable in that setting is even harder. And being vulnerable is a requirement of any good actor. Knowing the director has your best interest at heart is vital. The last thing I want to overhear after a show is, “That guy was terrible!”


TS: Where were you born and educated? Where did you get your training? What motivated you to become an actor? GW: I was born and raised just outside of Chicago. My first taste of things to come began in the 5th grade when I got cast to play the lead role in Tom Sawyer. Perhaps it says more about what I was like as a kid than it did about my acting talent. But I took to it in a big way. By the time I finished high school in Chicago, Steppenwolf Theatre Company, known for their intense, highly physical, inventive productions, had achieved international fame. Its core ensemble members had met at Illinois State University, which is where I ended up. After four years of required studying, I was invited to attend what was known as “Animals Class.” The idea was that you chose an animal and behaved like that


animal for an entire semester until your final exam. At the exam you were asked to confront the same imaginary species as yours and kill it. You were to be judged by your peers. If they didn’t unanimously agree, you’d fail the class. When I got to Chicago after graduation, my hopes of working at Steppenwolf were quashed. There were just too many actors my age and not enough roles to go around. I did, however, land my first job in their new 500-seat theatre. As a bartender. So, to keep myself engaged and creative, a few friends and I started our own theatre company on the South Side of Chicago. We rented a 2000-square-foot loft in an old DeSoto car dealership and converted it into a living space and a theatre. We all had day jobs to make ends meet, and then we’d rehearse and perform at night. Eventually, many years later, while living in New York, I got my chance to act at Steppenwolf, and it would prove to be my big break.


TS: Public school kids will read this interview and will want to know what it takes to be a successful actor—what advice can you give young people who want to act? GW: When you’re a kid, you enjoy playing. You explore. You make believe. The best and most successful actors I’ve worked with never lose their sense of playfulness. We do call it a play after all. My firm belief is that if you enjoy what you do and keep doing it, the work will find you.•


Paul Dano and Gary Wilmes in True West TRUE WEST UPSTAGE GUIDE 17


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24