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EDUCATION 069 Academy helps to raise


£2,400 for local charities The Skinners’ Kent Academy hosted A Christmas Affair, a charity fundraising event to raise money for Nourish Foodbank in Tunbridge Wells and Taylor Made Dreams. The event raised £2,400 from the sale of boutique discounted designer clothes – donated by The Childrensalon – and local businesses, who held stalls on the day. Sixth Form students helped to


set up and staff the event and also sold refreshments, which raised a total of £200, as part of the International Baccalaureate curriculum they follow.


Primary school application deadline nears


Applications for primary schools in Kent close at midnight on 15th


January. This includes applications for new starters in the reception year and also for children in Year 2 who are due to start at a different junior school for Year 3. Every child in the UK is required to be educated, but it is not compulsory for


children to attend reception class. A child must, however, attend some sort of formal education from the beginning of the school year that follows their fi fth birthday. Most educators agree that attending


reception class is the best introduction to school for young children as it teaches them the structure of the school day and allows them to meet other pupils whilst enjoying play-based learning.


YOUNG PUPILS WALK THE WALK!


New Early Years facility at Battle Abbey


The Mulberry is not only a rather delightful fruit from a tree, but is now the name of a brand new Early Years Nursery and Reception facility at Battle Abbey Prep School in East Sussex.


Situated in Hastings Road, the new facility allows the school to accept babies from just three months of age, for 50 weeks of the year. Children can stay at the school through to the end of their reception year.


The light and airy new building is described as ‘ecologically- sensitive’ and it provides a modern, caring environment with underfl oor heating and bespoke resources. There are also dedicated outside play areas.


Headteacher Maria Maslin said: “I would like to thank all those who have helped shape our new venture. We are delighted to be offering the very best early years provision with such a strong link to the Prep School and beyond.” • Visit battleabbeyschool.com


Pupils at Broadwater Down Primary School in Tunbridge Wells can now get outside and learn more about the beautiful landscape of their local area after the recent launch of the school’s new Welly Walk. Welly Walks are short, circular walks, which start and fi nish at the school gate. The High Weald AONB Partnership’s Education Offi cer, Rachel Bennington, presented the school with 1,000 copies of its new Welly Walk leafl et after developing the route with pupils as part of the High Weald Heroes education programme. Welly Walks inspire children to


explore the history, geography and wildlife of the medieval landscape of the High Weald Area of Outstanding Beauty. Each route is designed to highlight unique High Weald features near a school, such as sunken lanes, gill streams, hedges, ancient woodland and wildfl ower grassland. Broadwater Down’s Welly Walk explores nearby Hargate Forest, which has existed since medieval times. • For more information on Welly Walks, or to fi nd out how to become a High Weald Heroes school, visit highweald.org/learn- about/education


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