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BUILDING FABRIC & EXTERIORS


without compromising on aesthetics. The overall visual appeal of the


placed in a ceiling is a common area for heat transfer. To successfully combat this, it’s useful for self-builders to follow the Passivhaus Institute’s guidance that the rooflight must restrict the thermal losses of the window frame and glass edge. Essentially, individuals should choose a rooflight that offers the lowest U-value available by exploring its type of glazing and insulation within the frame. Current UK Building Regulations state a window must have a U-value of 1.6 or lower in order to comply with relevant legislations. Some manufacturers may offer quadruple-glazed rooflights in order to comply with these regulations,


however, self-builders should tread carefully before choosing these rooflights as the four panes of glass will be significantly heavier than a normal window and may require a crane for installation, dependent on the project and its available access. Rooflights that offer a U-value of 1.6 or below with triple glazing can be cheaper and easier to install, so individuals should research this thoroughly before selecting their chosen product.


They should also investigate the


rooflight’s frame as latest innovations have led to the creation of sleek aluminium frames that feature in built insulation for maximum thermal efficiency,


rooflight is just as important as its performance, so self-builders shouldn’t feel they’re having to compromise on aesthetics for greater thermal efficiency. There are a range of innovative flat, pitched and circular rooflights and pyramid roof lanterns available with low U-values, while also offering attractive and effective designs. Streamlined aluminium frames can maximise the natural light that can enter the property as traditional timber frames may often be quite bulky and take up more space within the ceiling.


Some aluminium frames enable up to 49 per cent more natural light to enter a room due to flush fitting against the ceiling’s plaster, providing one of the most contemporary and stylish solutions available.


By selecting innovative building


products that place high performance, lower energy output and quality aesthetics at the forefront of their design, self-builders can create a property that embraces style and substance in equal measures.


Vanessa Howard is chief marketing officer at Roof Maker


38 www.sbhonline.co.uk


september/october 2018


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