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global briefs Scientists’ Security


France Welcomes Beleaguered Climate Researchers French President Emmanuel Macron awarded 18 climate scientists from the U.S. and elsewhere millions of euros in grants to relocate to his country for the rest of Donald Trump’s presidential term. Macron’s “Make Our Planet Great Again” grants are meant to counter Trump’s intent on the climate change front following his declaration to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate accord. One winner, Camille Parmesan, of the University of Texas at Austin, who is working at an experimental ecology station in the Pyrenees charting how human-made climate change is affecting wildlife, says that in the U.S., “You are having to hide what you do.”


Clear Gain


Window-Like Solar Cells Could Power


Where hearts open and minds awaken Our weekly Sunday Services are


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40 Percent of U.S. Needs Solar energy is now the cheapest form of new energy in dozens of countries, with record-setting solar farms being built worldwide. Re- searchers have been investigating ways to make transparent solar pan- els that resemble glass that could be used as window panels at the same time as converting the light that shines on them into electricity. “Highly transparent solar cells represent the wave of the future for new solar applications,” explains materials scientist Richard Lunt, Ph.D., from Michigan State Universi- ty. “We analyzed their potential and show that by harvesting only invisible light, these devices have the poten- tial of generating a similar amount of electricity as rooftop solar while providing additional functionality to enhance the efficiency of buildings, automobiles and mobile electronics.” As reported in Nature Energy, his team has developed a transpar- ent, luminescent, solar concentrator that looks like clear glass, covered in small, organic molecules adept at capturing only ultraviolet and near-infrared wavelengths of light. The visible light that enables human vision isn’t obstructed, so we can see through the cell. If scaled up to cover the billions of square feet of glass surfaces throughout the U.S., it could potentially supply about 40 percent of our country’s energy needs.


Earth Day should encourage us to


reflect on what we are doing to make our planet a more


sustainable


andlivable place. — Scott Peters


10 NA Triangle www.natriangle.com


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