search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
BUILDING FABRIC & EXTERIORS


Choosing any heating solution is invariably closely geared to meeting Building Regulations


The overriding commonality between wet and electric UFH systems lies in the controls and considerable research and development in this area has benefited both systems. Importantly, this has made UFH even more efficient as it allows systems to operate only when needed and to the exact level of heat output required. Wireless systems offer further flexibility and can link to building management systems with touch screen control or even control from a mobile


phone. Wet and electric UFH systems may be linked to operate through a single controller. Consequently, complementary wet and electric UFH systems may be installed in a single building. This allows for the highest levels of user comfort while achieving exceptional energy efficiency. For example, in tiled areas, an electric system may be installed to take the chill off the floor in the summer without the need to fire up a boiler or heat pump. Meanwhile,


a wet system is installed in those areas where heating is only required during colder periods. On occasions, the two systems are combined to an even greater degree with heating pipes laid into the screed while cable mats are laid above to achieve the ultimate in energy efficiency and comfort.


When it comes to answering the question of ‘which is better’, wet and electric UFH systems have almost equal merit, and it is very much a case of horses for courses.


Steven Rooney is sales director of Gaia Climate Solutions


46 www.sbhonline.co.uk


january/february 2018


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60