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The ruins of the largest colosseum ever built, was believed to hold up to 80,000 people.


The Colosseum is still one of the most popular sites of ancient Rome, attracting millions of visitors each year.


destinations in the world. Preserving history is a local economic driver, unique to that city. Te importance of history is something we are understanding more and more here in our young Winnipeg city. I also remember renting a car on one of my trips. Tat lasted 45 minutes and I abandoned it very quickly. Rush hour is every hour in Rome. Te car and ancient road net- work placed in a radial pattern – the manner in which Rome was built – makes traveling difficult. Layer onto


thehubwinnipeg.com


The ruins reveal the complexity of this ancient forum.


that the ‘pleasant’ nature of Italian drivers on a road with no lines . . . it’s enough to drive the sanest person insane. Tere are always plenty of fountains to drink fresh wa-


ter from, public toilets that are cleaned and stationed by friendly ambassadors, and on every corner there is some- thing to eat or drink – a café or an ice-cream store, with ample restaurants of all types. Travelling around on Rome’s simple and well used bus system, integrated with its clean, safe subway that is


Winter 2018 • 41


Photo courtesy of Lisa Albo and Family.


Photo by Jensie De Gheest. Photo courtesy of Lisa Albo and Family.


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