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Grain is big business in the Carrot Valley.


with no understanding of the realities of the North or the needs of the businesses. Case in point? A pending federal regulation would limit the whale watching enter- prises in Hudson Bay, which teems with the animals in summer. Regulations are contemplated that would limit how close a boat or a snorkeler can come to a whale – an untenable plan to anyone who has ever seen how the whales flock to a novel item in the water. It’s not all government bureaucracy holding northern-


ers back, though. Tere is the ‘crab in a bucket’, syndrome, which says that “if I can’t have it, neither can you” and drags down enterprising crabs trying to get out of the pot. Tis is a typical attitude among the under-employed, and it comes from years of stifling enterprise. But all that will be changing. Te report aims to re-


empower northerners to take back their land and make it sing by supporting local enterprise, making regulation enable rather than limit, encouraging true engagement


Black Angus cattle near The Pas.


and partnerships between First Nations, Metis and the rest of the population; revising education and training to meet the actual needs of communities; encouraging in- vestment, and celebrating local success through stronger and more collaborative communication. Tis is a first step, say the co-chairs, understanding that


strategy papers and action plans need follow up. But it is a giant step in the right direction. It is the first time the white and indigenous communities have come together to resolve issues in partnership, to create opportunities and to rebuild relationships that have been soured by an attitude of paternalism. Te citizens of the North are tough and brave. Tey


have to overcome adversity every day and are stronger because of it. Now, after years of subjugation by govern- ment interference in their lives, they have permission to get back to the business of building and growing again. And they will.


Tourism north


Tourism is the poster child for the North but the facts may surprise you:


Tourism in the North represents only 3% of its GDP


87% of travel north is domestic and the average spend of these visitors is only $184


9% of travel north is from other provinces 3% is from the USA


1% is from overseas, but these visitors spend an average of $2,229


Area and Population


Northern Manitoba is generally defined as north of the 53rd parallel


It encompasses 438,492 square km


67% of Manitoba land base is northern 7% of the population lives in the North 75% of the population is First Nations 50% of indigenous people live on reserves


There are 58 airports/airfields in northern Manitoba The caves at Clearwater Lake. 24 • Winter 2018 The Hub


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