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Kingsbridge Community Garden Early winter in Kingsbridge Community Garden


Frosty-white and cold it lies Underneath the fretful skies... Though the winds are keen and chill Roses’ hearts are beating still And the garden tranquilly Dreams of happy hours to be… Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874-1942)


the late flowering dahlias, although there is still plenty of colour to be found in the garden. The blackbirds may well have stripped the holly of its magnificent crop of berries before you read this article but they seem to leave the crab apples till later and these hang like jewels from the trees in the lower garden. The yellow daisy-like flowers of Euryops pectinatus, a tender perennial native to South Africa, continue to defy the winter weather and provide an amazing display, along with stray ageranthemums and the sweet smelling ivy flowers, so much loved by our late flying insect visitors.


T Not so desirable has been the


repeated infestation of a species of honey fungus (Armillaria) around the elm tree seat stump. Despite a variety of annual attempts to eradicate this serious plant disease, it is reluctant to go away. In early autumn the sight is dramatic but by now it is reduced to a slimy mess. Unfortunately no commercial treatment is very effective.


he garden has been visited by Jack Frost several times already - he’s put an end to


On a brighter note, the raised


vegetable plots continue to flourish under the expert care of one of our volunteers. Regimented lines of red chard and spinach, leeks and curly kale are still providing pick-n-pay opportunities for regular visitors, who have also been enjoying our second crop of sweet potatoes which have grown so well in the lower polytunnel.


The workparty have also been busy up the ladders, not only putting the peach tree to bed for the winter, but also renewing the polytunnel doors, fetching unwanted saplings from the high wall and attempting to solve the mystery of the leaking roof in the main office-shed. (Raising the gutter levels may just have solved that problem.)


Looking back over 2017 we


were delighted to receive the Level Outstanding Award in the RHS ‘It’s your Neighbourhood’ Challenge, and to support Kingsbridge’s success in winning the ‘Britain in Bloom’ Gold Award once more.


Our final event of the year will be our annual ‘Carols by Candlelight Event’ on Tuesday December 19th at 6.00pm, with mulled wine and mince pies in the garden. Everyone is most welcome to join us then.


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