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28 By Holly & David Jones Food & Drink LOcaL PROduce • ReciPes • evenTs


Phesant for the festive season. W


inter is a great source of local food from the abundant fish and seafood coming into Brixham Fish Market


and the Plymouth Fisheries which you can buy at local fishmongers across South Hams to all the fab root vegetables and brassicas in the greengrocers and the game coming from the local shoots. We are lucky enough to have friends who drop in a few birds if they’ve been out for a day of shooting or beating and we love putting them to good use – the birds, not the friends. You can also buy them from local butchers e.g. Lidstones in Kingsbridge will often have game for sale (they should have reopened by now after recent renovations) or from Aune Valley Meats near Loddiswell; if you don’t get them free from friends, they don’t cost a lot to buy. Pheasant are the most numerous arrivals


“Plan ahead and make a terrine which can be frozen and


brought out for the festivities.”


Aune Valley Meat & Valley View Cafe


You’ll be surprised just what we do!


Place your


Christmas orders today!


Collect now available


NEW website Click &


Rake Farm, Loddiswell & 6 Church Street, Modbury


Loddiswell Shop: 01548 550413 Loddiswell Cafe: 01548 559126 Modbury Shop: 01548 830240


www.aunevalleymeat.co.uk


mannafromdevon.com 01803 752943


with the occasional partridge or pigeon. The breast is the meatiest bit so if we’re short for time, we just slit the skin over the breast, pull it back and then take the breast meat off with a sharp knife. If we have a bit more time, we’ll take the meat off the whole bird


as there is a bit more on the thighs. The legs get a bit sinewy so they just go straight into the stock pot as if we’re making chicken stock. Pick over the flesh in case of any lurking lead shot which you don’t want to bite into. We’re not great fans of well hung game so we use it as soon as it arrives, not leaving them hanging around which will increase the gaminess. If you can’t deal with them straightaway, leave them hanging in a cool place and don’t forget them especially if the weather becomes warm as you’ll attract bluebottles. As far as cooking the pheasant goes, you can pretty much treat them like chicken – roast or pan-fry the breasts, chop it up and cook them in a sauce (curry works well), or braise with mushrooms and red wine for a casserole which could then have a pastry topping put on. If you can’t get any pheasant or don’t like it, just use chicken breast and thigh. As Christmas is coming up, we’ve used the latest


delivery to plan ahead and make a terrine which can be frozen and brought out for the festivities. We’ve cut it into sections, wrapped it tightly in clingfilm and frozen it like that so we don’t have to get out the whole terrine. Served with some great bread and onion marmalade or cranberry sauce, it will make a lovely lunch, or serve it on biscuits with drinks, in sandwiches if you’re out for a walk or you could even use it as stuffing in a chicken or the turkey itself.


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