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BUILDING FABRIC & EXTERIORS


contrast colours to make them stand out from the surrounding wall finishes and furniture. Grab rails need to be firmly fixed and load bearing.


The breadth of style choice for baths to luxuriate in is endless. However, if access to a bath is a problem for anyone in your family, consider installing one with low sides. Walk-in baths, with doors, allow for much easier access for those less confident climbing over the bath rim. For flooring and shower tray surfaces, use slip-resistant surfaces to minimise the risk of slips and trips. When it comes to taps and shower controls, consider replacing conventional products with lever-operated controls for easy operation. Installing a thermostatic control decreases the risk of scalding and for the visually impaired, shower controls operated by touch buttons with tactile coding or illuminated controls can be fitted. When it comes to sanitaryware, a wall- hung WC improves access and manoeuvrability and makes cleaning easier. Bear in mind some people with disabilities often use products in a bathroom to lean against or to hold themselves upright. These should therefore be very firmly fixed against load-bearing walls. Speak to your


© Ideal Standard


installer and product manufacturer for more advice. And ensure your design specifies products which carry the CE Mark to ensure they are fit for purpose. As a self-builder, you need to be aware that Approved Document M Section 5 of the Building Regulations applies for inclusive design in your project, whether it’s a one-off or a larger project. Make sure your architect is aware of the code of practice for inclusive design as part of ‘BS 8300-2. Design of an accessible and inclusive built environment. Part 2. Buildings’. As part of the Royal Institute of British Architects’ commitment to inclusive


Trueline Fascia and Soffit complements extension


The property based in Chelsfield, Orpington was having a kitchen-diner refurbishment and extension in a modern contemporary design. Dickens Developments – the contractor on site contacted ARP’s Area Sales Manager – David Capel, as they had met at a previous site. David was invited to a site meeting, where the extension was surveyed and the various Trueline fascia and soffit options were discussed. Having completed the site survey, David provided a full quotation and Dickens Developments were then able to use their local Jewson’s at Orpington to fulfil the order. The bespoke Trueline Fascias and Soffits were made to measure in our in-house production facility, with CAD/CAM drawings produced and signed off by the client prior to going into production. The fascia profiles were polyester powder coated in matt black RAL 9005 with an over trim covering the fixings on the fascia. The finish was completed with prefabricated corners. These products were chosen as they suited the modern contemporary style of the extension, but also ties in with the windows and complements the overall design. Aluminium was the perfect choice for the fascia and soffits on this property as it is strong, durable and non-corrosive. With the ability to match the coating to the other elements of the building, ensures that the system blends with the rest of the property.


0116 289 4400 www.arp-ltd.com Grey is here to stay


Freefoam, a leading manufacturer of a wide range of innovative products for the building industry is, following feedback from customers, delighted to announce an addition to its popular Weatherboard cladding range with the introduction of a new colour option Slate Grey. Slightly darker in tone when compared to the very popular Storm grey it will appeal to those looking for a more defined appearance to their project. The Weatherboard cladding is a 170mm wide board featuring a subtle embossed wood effect finish and an attractive overlapping appearance to create a 'New England' look. Already available in a range of traditional and contemporary shades, from subtle Pale Gold and Cappuccino through to more dramatic Argyl Brown and Colonial Blue the addition of Slate Grey will make a welcome addition to customers. Fortex®


is an innovative


cladding range that features an attractive subtle embossed ‘wood effect’ finish coupled with the benefits of low maintenance PVC. PVC-U cladding requires minimal maintenance once installed, a major benefit for property owners and a compelling feature for any property developer or housing provider. With significant environmental credentials, being awarded an A+ rating from the Building Research Establishment’s (BRE) ‘Green Guide To Specification’ when installed with standard components, the range makes a real alternative to timber and fibre cement products.


01604 591110 www.freefoam.com 26 www.sbhonline.co.uk november/december 2017


design, Stephen Hodder, past president of the Institute said, “The RIBA is proud to be part of the Government and construction industries’ drive to create inclusive and accessible environments for everyone. Architects, construction professionals and their clients need collectively to have the skills to deliver on this shared pledge. RIBA is committed to ensuring that inclusive design is part of an architect’s education portfolio and professional development.”


Yvonne Orgill is CEO at the Bathroom Manufacturer’s Association


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