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A school bus driver for Sharp Bus Lines in Ontario, Canada demonstrates how an embedded video monitor in the rearview mirror of the contractor’s Saf-T-Liner C2 displays a 360-degree view around the vehicle.


Te initial wording of the bill was also too vague, and the task of


rewording the bill was passed back and forth between the Depart- ment of Education and the Department of Motor Vehicles. Te law was expanded to include video cameras and monitors, and some districts are choosing this technology over sensors. Wayne Public Schools recently purchased three new IC Bus models that are equipped with specially designed 360-degree cameras from Rosco Vision Systems that provide a view around the school bus via a monitor embedded in the driver’s rearview mirror. “I like the concept of the camera systems better than the other op- tions out there,” said Richard Kibitski, the district’s fleet manager. “With the sensors, there were too many false alarms, and the driver tends to tune them out.” He added that Wayne Public Schools transportation staff found sensors to be harder to maintain. Te systems were mounted on the bottom rub-rail, and the sensors were frequently covered with road salt. “Plus, it’s pretty easy to knock them off the side of the bus on a snow bank,” Kibitsky added. “I’ve had


58 School Transportation News • MAY 2018


tow truck drivers tear out the sensor wiring on the back of the bus. With cameras, they are up where the clearance lights are. I’m waiting for a driver to take one out with a tree branch, but so far that hasn’t happened.” Feedback on the cameras has been positive. “Early on, (drivers) complained that the view was disorienting when they looked in the mirror, especially when they were backing up,” he added. “But they adjusted quickly and really seem to appreciate the camera system now, and if the camera lenses get covered with road salt, it doesn’t take much to clean them off.” Lori Jetha, director of marketing for Seon, pointed out that


prevention is a better solution to protecting students than pros- ecuting motorists who pass stopped buses. “I’d like to see the ‘Danger Zone’ turned into the ‘Safety Zone,’” Jetha said. “Te stop arm cameras aren’t preventing students from being hit by passing motorists, they are capturing the incident. We want to prevent the children from walking in front of moving vehicles in the first place.”


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