search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
A February 2018 article in School Transportation News, entitled “Alternative Fuel vs. Diesel: Searching for the


Michael Taylor of the Propane Education & Research Council


Truth in Cost and Benefit Data,” may lead readers to believe that the increased purchase of alternative fueled buses was a direct result of the emission reductions standards. On the contrary, the adoption of propane autogas began decades ago in the 1970s, well before these standards went into place. During this period, many high- ly-respected fleets elected to move away from conventional fuels to propane autogas. Among those fleets were Schwan’s Foods and Northside ISD in San Antonio, Texas. Propane is a clean burning, domestic, sustainable, affordable, and abundant fuel. It is easily transitioned into any fleet, especially centrally-fueled school buses, and is providing substantial savings for their owners. Tese savings can be applied to necessary investments like purchasing more school buses, employing more teachers, enhancing facilities, and provisioning additional funds for other important resources in our school districts. One of the objectives of the EPA Clean Air Standards Act is to dramatically reduce toxic vehicle tailpipe emis-


sions. But, the environmental concerns do not stop at the tailpipe. Gasoline and diesel are toxic and will contam- inate air, water, and soil resources. Diesel and gasoline fuel handling, storage, and spillage costs add up over the lifecycle of a vehicle. Unlike gasoline and diesel, propane is non-toxic and stands above the rest as a non-contami- nant in its natural state, thereby eliminating these costs when propane buses are purchased. Propane autogas infrastructure provides a similar but safer experience for operators during refueling. Quick connect K-15 nozzles lock securely during refueling, eliminating any possibility of spilling fuel and/or emitting virtually any emissions during the process. Fuel spills are eliminated with a closed loop pressurized fuel system and hazmat cleanup is never a concern. Furthermore, drivers love propane autogas because they don’t wear the smell of gasoline or diesel while driving or exiting their vehicles. Propane autogas is the healthier, fiscal choice for cost conscious fleets like school buses, in school districts, looking to benefit students, technicians and drivers. 


Michael Taylor is the director of autogas business development for the Propane Education & Research Council. He can be reached at michael.taylor@propane.com.


FREE CAKE Now that we have your attention...


Isn’t her safety worth eleven minutes?


Come celebrate with us at the 25th Anniversary STN EXPO


Extravaganza Networking Party. We’ll have lots of fun, food, drinks and entertainment. More details at stnexpo.com.


Verifi ed electronic inspections are fast and virtually foolproof. You can be assured that your drivers are doing a thorough and accurate inspection by completing the simple steps in Zonar’s Electronic Verifi ed Inspection Reporting (EVIR®


) system. Eleven minutes that can mean the difference between best practices and worst-case scenario. www.stnexpo.com July 13–18, 2018 | Peppermill Resort | Reno, NV


Turn your fl eet into a smart fl eet with Zonar. We offer a wide range of solutions to help you save time, money and something you can never put a price on.


877.843.3847 • zonarsystems.com


Client: Zonar Systems – Child Safety Ad #1 - Her safety Created by: Publication:


GSS Communiqations, 323.939.1181


www.stnonline.com 21 Student Transportation News, STN, 11/17 issue


Early Bird


SAVE $100 (ends 6/15)


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68