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Beauty in a bulb


6 summer magicians for glowing colour By Dorothy Dobbie


Dahlias come in a variety of colours and sizes, at least one should be ideal for your yard. I


f there is one thing that bulbs, especially summer bulbs, have in common it’s incandescent colour. The flow- ers of dahlias, gladiolas, crocosmia and other spring-


planted bulbs seem to glow with a burning determination to make themselves visible. Some of them enhance their presence with fragrance. Freesia and tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa) are so high on the fragrant list that they can perfume an entire yard. The thing that some gardeners don’t like about spring- planted bulbs is that, in most areas of our province, they


localgardener.net


have to be taken up in fall and stored over winter because they are generally quite tender. While it is true that, occa- sionally, even lower zones will have a lovely agapanthus survive the winter near a home foundation on a south facing wall, those are rare occasions for the majority of us. Given that summer bulbs are relatively inexpensive,


though, why not treat them as annuals and start fresh each spring? The rewards are stunning. Here are six wonderful examples of summer bulbs that will knock your eyes out and leave you determined to plant even more next year.


Spring 2015 • 23


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