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WIND TURBINE CLUTTER


It is not beyond the realms of possibility that excessive use of S and X-band to do a task which can be achieved with only 2 Mhz of L-band could cause issues in delivery of contracts which need to be safeguarded for 25 years in order not to jeopardise either operation of the airport or revenue for the wind farm, especially in an environment where people are not comfortable in discussing where liability for these potential future charges should lay.


INDUSTRY DECISION Rob continues: “We are executing a contract with the CAA to demonstrate the ability of Holographic Radar to provide a spectrum-efficient alternative to S-band primary air traffic surveillance radar. The future looks exciting.


“The key now is to let the industry decide. Does it want to remain in the legacy world of conventional radar affected by clutter such as wind turbines or invest in a new approach? The feedback we are receiving from the market is that new technology is required, radar has to be fixed.”


COST EFFECTIVE


Aveillant’s 3D Holographic Radar has been developed to be more cost effective across its lifecycle. It outlives the traditional PSR and without any moving parts, maintenance is reduced, simple and can be performed without any disruption to performance.


Commercially available now, 3D Holographic Radar is being implemented across the UK and further discussions are underway with many airports and ANSPs across Europe. It’s scalable to meet all coverage requirements, from small deployable units to regional solutions.


L-BAND Rob says: “Our spectrum-efficient radar technology operates in L-band, as opposed to the congested S-band commonly used by the aviation sector and MOD. S-band is a sweet spot for mobile data transmission and so is in high demand by mobile phone operators. Ofcom is working to release 500MHz of radio spectrum below 5GHz, including 100MHz of S-band spectrum by 2020.


“This could leave many airports needing to modify or replace their radar with a difficult choice. The solution will not be to relocate wideband radars into L-band, there isn’t capacity in the band. Even with an optimistic six month project to replace many of the elements of an S-band radar, the problem will be increased due to loss of operation or mitigation cover during the period. A wind farm lifetime is 25 years and airports need to ensure any potential risks during that lifetime are covered, including changes to the wider ATM system, legislation and wind turbine design, changes like these could cause some ‘good enough today’ mitigations to fail or at the best be less effective.”


TELECOMMUNICATIONS TERMINAL EQUIPMENT DIRECTIVE (R&TTE) In addition to the spectrum release programme the replacement of the current Radio and R&TTE 1999/5/EC by the Radio Equipment Directive (RED) is now underway and will be completed June 2017. Unlike the R&TTE the RED requires all equipment, including radar, to justify their use of spectrum and to be compliant.


PROOF OF THE PUDDING Rob concludes: “We are often told that there is too much risk, a conventional radar is risk-free. I know at least four airports who would disagree, with some radar installations taking longer than three years to gain approval.


Every project has risks and it is how you manage these risks that matters. Sometimes those people passionate enough to think they can change the world actually do. As Steve Jobs said, ‘The point is that new technology will not necessarily replace old technology, but it will date it. By definition. It will eventually replace it’. Thank you.”


Rob Abbott


Aviation Director Aveillant


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


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