This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
CULTURAL HERITAGE THE CHALLENGE


The UK is famous for its heritage, and rightly so. The country contains a wealth of archaeological and historic features ranging from the remains of human ancestors 500,000 years ago, to prehistoric monuments such as Stonehenge, the Standing Stones of Stenness ; Roman remains such as Hadrian’s Wall and the towns of Silchester and Wroxeter; numerous medieval castles & churches throughout the country; 18th & 19th century country mansions, frequently within designed grounds and parklands; 19th century industrial remains through to WWII and Cold War structures.


RECENT PLANNING DIFFICULTIES Over recent years the historic environment has become an increasingly problematic for wind farm developers promoting on-shore wind farm schemes through the planning system. Although wind farms tend not to have particularly significant direct impacts upon archaeological remains, historic buildings and the historic landscape, there is a perception by many involved in the planning system, that the presence of wind turbines in the landscape can have drastic adverse impacts upon the setting of these heritage assets.


PRINCIPAL ISSUES


The principle issues presented by the historic environment are the potential physical impact upon buried archaeological remains and the potential impact on the setting of listed buildings, scheduled monuments, registered parks and gardens, World Heritage Sites, conservation areas and other designated heritage assets.


Due to the relatively small size of the footprint of wind turbines and their associated infrastructure, wind farms and single turbines generally do not to have significant direct impacts upon below ground archaeological remains. However, local planning authorities increasingly expect at least some for of archaeological evaluation to be undertaken pre- determination of planning applications.


CONSIDERABLE VARIANCE The scope of such work can vary enormously from scheme to scheme across the country and consequently can present a financial and planning risk at early project planning. Typically archaeological evaluations for proposed wind farms comprise of a geophysical survey but may also include other techniques such as trial trenching or fieldwalking.


FEATURE SPONSOR


MANAGING THE PAST WHILE DELIVERING ENERGY FOR THE FUTURE


In the event that a proposed wind farm will have a direct physical impact on archaeological remains, there may be a need for mitigation works such as micro-siting turbines to avoid the remains or archaeological excavation ahead of construction commencing.


GREATEST RISK


It is the issue of the potential effect on the setting of designated heritage assets that poses the greatest risk from heritage to the securing of planning permission for wind farms and single turbines.


The issue of what constitutes setting has been the subject of a long debate within the heritage profession but following inclusion of a definition of setting in Annex 2 of the NPPF and the guidance issued by English Heritage in 2011 entitled Setting of Heritage Assets, there is a greater degree of clarity on what is the setting of a heritage asset than there was previously.


56


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100