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MARINE CO-ORDINATION


FEATURE SPONSOR


MARINE CO-ORDINATION


NEW RESPONSIBILITIES: NEW COMPETENCIES


TODAY’S OFFSHORE WORKING ENVIRONMENT IS AN EXTREMELY BUSY PLACE WHERE MONEY CAN BE MADE OR LOST QUICKLY.


To help maximise profitability, Green Marine Solutions (GMS) has redefined the tough modern demands now made of a key project team member who can save millions of pounds at sea – the marine co-ordinator (MC).


By upgrading the MC’s basic wind industry role, they are showing operators how to make major gains from new technology, cost-structures and online communication. In parallel, they are also launching the UK’s first dedicated training course for professional MC development.


RADICAL CHANGE


The MC’s core job is changing swiftly. Traditional skills are fast becoming redundant. New competencies are needed.


MC’s have two distinct roles. On large construction projects, groups of MC’s - with different but complementary skills – often work as a single integrated team to bring specialist vessels, highly- qualified technicians and time- and cost- sensitive tasks together successfully.


However, as completed projects move on into the operational phase, these shared responsibilities often fall very quickly onto a single set of shoulders.


GMS’ goal is to ensure that all MC’s can be equipped with very broad shoulders!


ALONE … AND NOT ALONE Construction is a hectic time with big budgets and ample resources and skilled people on site. MC teams are correspondingly large.


During operation and production, everything changes. Budgets shrink. Profitability is much more important. A single MC can easily feel that he or she is now working alone.


However, MC's are not alone, even when working remotely across many different sites. In today’s digitally-connected world of work, many different data sources and authoritative advice can be instantaneously available to back an MC’s own judgement.


REAL-TIME OPERATIONAL ASSET MANAGEMENT (ROAM)


Well-selected and carefully trained MC’s can now have cost-effective access to real-time project data, analysis and online co-ordination tools. GMS has developed its unique ROAM (Real-time Operational Asset Management) system to break new ground in this area.


Systems such as ROAM give a constantly updated picture of the position and working status of key assets many miles, or kilometres, apart. But MC’s must be trained to make the most of these aids.


MC’s – wherever they work – also need to be able to talk instantly to other co-ordination experts who can bring experiences and expertise from related areas to add to their ‘firepower’.


This is why GMS MC’s are in constant touch with home base and a broad panel of other marine experts within the company. It is unusual for MC’s recruited from agencies to have this external support.


NEW COMPETENCIES


However, these strategic changes have not yet filtered down to many parts of the wind industry. As a result, valuable commercial bonuses are being lost.


By tradition, almost all marine co-ordination tenders still request a CV that includes Master Mariner qualifications. This senior requirement targets candidates from a broad range of professional backgrounds – oil & gas, fishing, deep sea, or crew transfer vessel skippers.


The wind farm operators’ dilemma is knowing how well a particular candidate’s accumulated experience is matched to the ability to make complex decisions wisely and quickly on fast-moving projects.


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www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


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