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FEATURE SPONSOR


MARINE CO-ORDINATION GMS SOLUTION LARGE FLEETS


Offshore construction sites can potentially involve up to 30 construction vessels. Each needs accurate time scheduling, plus a detailed understanding of operational limitations. If things go wrong, cost-effective contingency plans are essential. Health & safety is paramount. Vessels often work in time-sensitive charter windows. Weather can be highly-unpredictable.


It is vital for MC’s to have a firm mental and digital ‘fix’ or ‘situational awareness’ on all combinations and possibilities.


The challenges are even more complex when large fleets and many different sub- contractors are spread far apart across, say, a 120 turbine deep-water offshore site. The inevitable conclusion is that the era of time-served seafarers, equipped with little more than a radio and remote computer link, is being overtaken by the sheer complexity of the modern task matrix.


Seafarer experience is often based on the linear command of ships and crew members using written procedures within subscribed boundaries. There may be no real relationship between past experience and wind industry challenges. This can be a problem where, for example, advanced logistical or specialised marine skills are needed. New competencies are essential.


GMS has amended and updated the definition of a modern MC to include a multiplicity of maritime and logistics skills linked directly to real offshore wind industry conditions.


For example, Coastguard professionals co-ordinate complex rescue and recovery operations in adverse conditions. GMS has a policy of recruiting this transferable skill- set into its own MC teams.


TAKING THE LEAD


Alex Harrison is a former Coastguard Officer and now leads GMS’ marine co- ordination programme on operational projects. He has also helped to design the new course and the launch of a new MC training academy


TRAINED TO THINK AHEAD “Coastguard officers are trained to prioritise tasks quickly as routine, important and emergency,” he explains. “They gather information rapidly from numerous sources, filter it and decide on action while constantly reviewing and re-evaluating the situation. The ability to foresee problems is vital.


“For example, in a search and rescue mission I would see that a helicopter only has two hours of flying endurance and automatically be thinking ahead what I can do next.


“The skill is about developing mitigation plans and transfers very readily to the commercial environment with construction vessels,” he adds.


GMS’ bespoke MC course focuses on operational communications, emergency response, chart work, general maritime, meteorology, seamanship, plus IMO. IMDG and SOLAS.


Importantly, it also includes a special marine co-ordination module which looks at contemporary skills that MCs must be kept right up-to-date to do their job properly.


“Often it’s about filling essential knowledge and skills gaps. Many candidates already have excellent partial skill-sets. The course is designed to ensure all-round competencies,” concluded Alex.


Green Marine Solutions Click to view more info


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


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