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Foundation


the carriage, and the more efficient tractor replaced this sturdy breed subsequent to the end of World War II. The number of broodmares inhabiting the countryside dropped substantially as the 1950s rolled on until in 1961 there were only 1,322 mares left from a population of nearly 10,000 a decade earlier. The breeders sought a new career for their hardy and steadfast servants. The sport of riding simply for pleasure and competitions for the rank and file were surging in popularity, so the breeders took advantage of this trend to reinvent their horse as a top sport model. To a large degree the Thoroughbred


T


is responsible for the transformation of the Holsteiner from farm laborer to international competitor. Approximately 60 different Thoroughbreds were brought in to stud service during the 1960s. Many achieved some degree of success in producing sporty types from the existing mare population. However, several are now considered foundation sires after producing dynasties of unimaginable proportions which have formed the basis of what the breed is today. Ramzes, an Anglo-Arab, was leased to


Holstein in 1951, 1952, 1959 and 1960. His crosses with Holsteiner mares produced a long list of first class jumpers and a breeding dynasty to his credit from his five Holstein approved sons. His influence was not limited to his sons as his daughters also became top producers ensuring that many of today’s sport competitors carry the name of Ramzes in their pedigree. His grandson Ramiro went on to produce nine sons for Holstein after a tremendous jumping career at the international level. Cottage Son was introduced to Holsteiner breeding in 1959. A tall,


he career of the original Holsteiner horse was to pull a plow or a carriage. Eventually the automobile replaced


Sires of Te Modern Holsteiner


imposing, dark brown horse with enormous presence, he came from England where he had already created multiple top level eventing horses, several of whom competed in the 1960 Olympics. He produced big horses that were easy to ride, good jumpers with super dispositions. Still today his presence in a pedigree is highly valued as a guaranty of performance capabilities. Sadly he had to be put down after only four years at stud but left behind 14 approved sons to the benefit of the Holsteiner breed. Ladykiller was a Thoroughbred stallion that could not have been more appropriately named. The bay colt was introduced to Holstein’s broodmares in 1965 as a four-year old. From his very first foal crop 12 stallions were approved. He went on to sire a total of 35 approved sons, among them the two fantastically successful progenitors Lord and Landgraf. The number of sport horses produced from the line of Ladykiller numbers in the thousands now. His ability to pass on beauty, marvelous basic gaits and particularly spectacular jumping talent has never been equaled by any other Thoroughbred in Holstein. Marlon, a successful racehorse from


England, was also introduced to Holstein in 1965. By 1975 he had established his dominance as a producer of event horses and became Germany’s leading producer of horses for the sport. His son Madrigal won individual bronze and team silver at the Montreal Olympics. He produced horses with beautiful, correct conformation and superb gaits, many of which found their way into dressage sport at the time. In the end, 21 sons of Marlon were approved as stallions. Sacramento Song in hindsight was


somewhat overlooked by the breeders during his time in Holstein from 1973 - 1979. Despite his classic English breeding,


42 May/June 2011 SPECIAL HOLSTEINER SECTION


By Wendy Webster


Ramzes (1937–1963)


Cottage Son (1944–1963)


Ladykiller (1961–1979)


Marlon (1958–1981)


Sacramento Song (1967–1979)


American Holsteiner Horse Association


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