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p 37 • FALL/WINTER 2010


Vermeer had the camera obscura. Bernini had the pointing machine. And today’s sculptors have digital sculpting software – a tool that may be a similarly important artistic innovation.


While digital sculpting is not new, its adoption has been increasingly swift in the past five years. It is entirely possible for artists today to design, sculpt, and produce gallery-caliber works of distinction without ever touching the physical medium – works that also give no indication that the design process was computer-assisted.


To dispel a myth from the start: real sculptors DO use digital tools. Indeed, many 3D artists are finding that digital sculpting is allowing them to employ techniques and attain levels of detail that are either impossible or so time consuming as to be impractical in physical materials. For projects that involve more than one artist, working digitally also provides a time-efficient way to distribute the work load as well as better utilization of skills – freeing up more experienced artists to focus on the masterly techniques they really love about their work.


Figure 9. “Sean,” (2010), Simon Goodall (photo credit: Simon Goodall)


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