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p 13 • FALL/WINTER 2010


Lying to this Sea of Milk, (2009) (Foreground) laminated wood /enamel/silver leaf 30 x 300 x 300


wanted to go. I don’t think student have that kind of freedom now. I prefer to do a lot of studio work for my research. I think students are trapped now with a lot of paperwork research. In Victoria, in my undergraduate work I worked with Roland Brenner. He had his own approach to sculpture, really definite. He introduced me to British sculpture like (the work of) Anthony Carro; he was a student of Carros’.


I was introduced to Peter Hide. I worked as an assistant with him for a little bit, helping him in the shop, the same with Roland. Different metal sculptors came through (the college, also) Doug Benthham. I reacted against it – all they did was steel. If you didn’t play the vocabulary you weren’t accepted. I tried some different things - some almost opposite.


A big influence on me was Kim Adams – a student. He told us to get out of the University


and to get out on the streets, do our own shows, that we shouldn’t depend on an institution to teach you what you need.


J: How does that influence you as an instructor? Do you still have a bit of that anti establishment attitude? B: Yes quite a bit, quite a bit. (In Victoria) we got more and more new equipment at the University. Things centered around steel. But then you have to get out of there eventually and still do your own work, and to work with what you have. You’ve got to set up your own shop, so I got more into wood – different equipment – more realistic to get the material and to set up my own shop. There was a group of us in Calgary - we shared a studio with Walter May. Eventually rents were getting too high and we were getting squeezed out, so some of us built ‘backyard studios’. I doubled the size of my garage (by using wood as my medium). I could


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